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dc.contributor.authorTwyman, Nathan W.
dc.contributor.authorProudfoot, Jeffrey G.
dc.contributor.authorCameron, Ann-Frances
dc.contributor.authorCase, Eric
dc.contributor.authorBurgoon, Judee K.
dc.contributor.authorTwitchell, Douglas P.
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-03T21:08:59Z
dc.date.available2020-08-03T21:08:59Z
dc.date.issued2020-04-02
dc.identifier.citationNathan W. Twyman, Jeffrey G. Proudfoot, Ann-Frances Cameron, Eric Case, Judee K. Burgoon & Douglas P. Twitchell (2020) Too Busy to Be Manipulated: How Multitasking with Technology Improves Deception Detection in Collaborative Teamwork, Journal of Management Information Systems, 37:2, 377-395, DOI: 10.1080/07421222.2020.1759938en_US
dc.identifier.issn0742-1222
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/07421222.2020.1759938
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/641981
dc.description.abstractDeception is an unfortunate staple in group work. Guarding against team members' deceptive tactics and alternative agendas is difficult and may seem even more difficult in technology-driven business environments that have made multitasking during teamwork increasingly commonplace. This research develops a foundation for a nuanced theoretical understanding of deception detection under these conditions. The intersection of information technology multitasking and deception detection theories is shown to produce various and sometimes competing ideas about how this type of multitasking might affect truthfulness assessments in real-time teamwork. A laboratory study involving a collaborative game helped evaluate the different ideas using manipulated deception and multitasking behaviors in a real-time, virtual group environment. The results provide evidence that information multitasking can actually improve deception detection, likely because multitaskers engage less in the team conversation, making themselves less manipulable. As understanding of multitasking benefits increases, managers and designers can incorporate effective multitasking into collaborative processes.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTDen_US
dc.rights© 2020 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectDeception detectionen_US
dc.subjectmultitaskingen_US
dc.subjectmulticommunicatingen_US
dc.subjectgroup worken_US
dc.subjectperformanceen_US
dc.subjectStrikeCOMen_US
dc.subjectcredibility assessmenten_US
dc.titleToo Busy to Be Manipulated: How Multitasking with Technology Improves Deception Detection in Collaborative Teamworken_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1557-928X
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Ctr Management Informat, Eller Coll Managementen_US
dc.identifier.journalJOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMSen_US
dc.description.note18 month embargo; published online: 16 June 2020en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Management Information Systems
dc.source.volume37
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage377
dc.source.endpage395


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