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dc.contributor.authorRau, Benjamin M.
dc.contributor.authorTausch, Robin
dc.contributor.authorReiner, Alicia
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Dale W.
dc.contributor.authorChambers, Jeanne C.
dc.contributor.authorBlank, Robert R.
dc.contributor.authorLucchesi, Annmarrie
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-05T06:51:10Z
dc.date.available2020-09-05T06:51:10Z
dc.date.issued2010-03-01
dc.identifier.citationRau, B. M., Tausch, R., Reiner, A., Johnson, D. W., Chambers, J. C., Blank, R. R., & Lucchesi, A. (2010). Influence of prescribed fire on ecosystem biomass, carbon, and nitrogen in a pinyon juniper woodland. Rangeland Ecology & Management, 63(2), 197-202.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409X
dc.identifier.doi10.2111/REM-D-09-00088.1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/642778
dc.description.abstractIncreases in pinyon and juniper woodland cover associated with land-use history are suggested to provide offsets for carbon emissions in arid regions. However, the largest pools of carbon in arid landscapes are typically found in soils, and aboveground biomass cannot be considered long-term storage in fire-prone ecosystems. Also, the objectives of carbon storage may conflict with management for other ecosystem services and fuels reduction. Before appropriate decisions can be made it is necessary to understand the interactions between woodland expansion, management treatments, and carbon retention. We quantified effects of prescribed fire as a fuels reduction and ecosystem maintenance treatment on fuel loads, ecosystem carbon, and nitrogen in a pinyon-juniper woodland in the central Great Basin. We found that plots containing 30% tree cover averaged nearly 40000 kg ha-1 in total aboveground biomass, 80000 kg ha-1 in ecosystem carbon (C), and 5000 kg ha-1 in ecosystem nitrogen (N). Only 25% of ecosystem C and 5% of ecosystem N resided in aboveground biomass pools. Prescribed burning resulted in a 65% reduction in aboveground biomass, a 68% reduction in aboveground C, and a 78% reduction in aboveground N. No statistically significant change in soil or total ecosystem C or N occurred. Prescribed fire was effective at reducing fuels on the landscape and resulted in losses of C and N from aboveground biomass. However, the immediate and long-term effects of burning on soil and total ecosystem C and N is still unclear. 
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectcarbon storage
dc.subjectecosystem maintenance
dc.subjectfuels management
dc.titleInfluence of Prescribed Fire on Ecosystem Biomass, Carbon, and Nitrogen in a Pinyon Juniper Woodland
dc.typetext
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalRangeland Ecology & Management
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Rangeland Ecology & Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform August 2020
dc.source.volume63
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage197-202
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-05T06:51:10Z


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