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dc.contributor.authorBailey, Derek W.
dc.contributor.authorVanWagoner, Harv C.
dc.contributor.authorWeinmeister, Robin
dc.contributor.authorJensen, Delyn
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-05T07:10:09Z
dc.date.available2020-09-05T07:10:09Z
dc.date.issued2008-01-01
dc.identifier.citationBailey, D. W., Van Wagoner, H. C., Weinmeister, R., & Jensen, D. (2008). Evaluation of low-stress herding and supplement placement for managing cattle grazing in riparian and upland areas. Rangeland Ecology & Management, 61(1), 26-37.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409X
dc.identifier.doi10.2111/06-130.1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/642922
dc.description.abstractManagement practices are often needed to ensure that riparian areas are not heavily grazed by livestock. A study was conducted in Montana during midsummer to evaluate the efficacy of low-stress herding and supplement placement to manage cattle grazing in riparian areas. Three treatments were evaluated in three pastures over a 3-yr period in a Latin-square design (n = 9). Each year, naïve 2-yr-old cows with calves were randomly assigned to the three treatments: 1) free-roaming control, 2) herding from perennial streams to upland target areas, and 3) herding to upland sites with low-moisture block supplements. Stubble heights along the focal stream were higher (P = 0.07) in pastures when cattle were herded (mean +/- SE, 23 +/- 2 cm) than in controls (15 +/- 3cm). Global positioning system telemetry data showed that herding reduced the time cows spent near (< 100 m) perennial streams (P = 0.01) and increased the use of higher elevations (P = 0.07) compared with controls. Evening visual observations provided some evidence that free-roaming cows (44% +/- 19%) were in riparian areas more frequently (P=0.11) than herded cows (23% +/- 6%). Fecal abundance along the focal stream was less (P=0.07) with herding (61.9 +/- 11.4 kg ha-1) than in controls (113.2 +/- 11.4 kg ha-1). Forage utilization within 600 m of supplement sites was greater (P=0.06) when cows were herded to low-moisture blocks (18% +/- 6%) compared with controls and herding alone (8% +/- 2%). Moving cattle to uplands at midday using low-stress herding is an effective tool to reduce use of riparian areas. Herding cattle to low-moisture blocks can increase grazing of nearby upland forage but may not provide additional reduction in cattle use of riparian areas compared with herding alone. 
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectdistribution
dc.subjectgrazing behavior
dc.subjectherding
dc.subjectriparian areas
dc.subjectsupplement blocks
dc.titleEvaluation of Low-Stress Herding and Supplement Placement for Managing Cattle Grazing in Riparian and Upland Areas
dc.typetext
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalRangeland Ecology & Management
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Rangeland Ecology & Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform August 2020
dc.source.volume61
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage26-37
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-05T07:10:09Z


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