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dc.contributor.authorTeague, W. Richard
dc.contributor.authorAnsley, R. Jim
dc.contributor.authorPinchak, William E.
dc.contributor.authorDowhower, Steven L.
dc.contributor.authorGerrard, Shannon A.
dc.contributor.authorWaggoner, J. Alan
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-05T07:13:17Z
dc.date.available2020-09-05T07:13:17Z
dc.date.issued2008-09-01
dc.identifier.citationTeague, W. R., Ansley, R. J., Pinchak, W. E., Dowhower, S. L., Gerrard, S. A., & Waggoner, J. A. (2008). Interannual herbaceous biomass response to increasing honey mesquite cover on two soils. Rangeland Ecology & Management, 61(5), 496-508.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409X
dc.identifier.doi10.2111/07-114.1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/642977
dc.description.abstractThis study quantified herbaceous biomass responses to increases in honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa Torr.) cover on two soils from 1995 to 2001 in north central Texas. Vegetation was sampled randomly with levels of mesquite ranging from 0% to 100%. With no mesquite covering the silt loam soils of bottomland sites, peak herbaceous biomass averaged (6SE) X 300 +/- 210 kg ha-1 vs. –560 +/- 190 kg ha-1 on clay loam soils of upland sites (P = 0.001). A linear decline of 14 +/- 2.5 kg ha-1 in herbaceous biomass occurred for each percent increase in mesquite cover (P = 0.001). The slope of this decline was similar between soils (P=0.135). Herbaceous biomass with increasing mesquite cover varied between years (P=0.001) as did the slope of decline (P=0.001). Warm-season herbaceous biomass decreased linearly with increasing mesquite cover averaging a 73 +/- 15% reduction at 100% mesquite cover (P = 0.001) compared to 0% mesquite cover. Cool-season herbaceous biomass was similar between soils with no mesquite, 1 070 +/- 144 kg ha-1 for silt loam vs. 930 +/- 140 kg ha-1 for clay loam soils, but averaged 340 +/- 174 kg ha-1 more on silt loam than on clay loam soils at 100% mesquite cover (P = 0.004). Multiple regression analysis indicated that each centimeter of precipitation received from the previous October through the current September produced herbaceous biomass of 51 kg ha-1 on silt loam and 41 kg ha-1 on clay loam soils. Herbaceous biomass decreased proportionally with increasing mesquite cover up to 29 kg ha-1 at 100% mesquite cover for each centimeter of precipitation received from January through September. Increasing mesquite cover reduces livestock forage productivity and intensifies drought effects by increasing annual herbaceous biomass variability. From a forage production perspective there is little advantage to having mesquite present. 
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectcompetition
dc.subjectdrought
dc.subjectprecipitation variability
dc.subjectProsopis glandulosa
dc.subjectsavannas
dc.subjectspecies composition
dc.subjectwoody encroachment
dc.subjectwoody plants
dc.titleInterannual Herbaceous Biomass Response to Increasing Honey Mesquite Cover on Two Soils
dc.typetext
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalRangeland Ecology & Management
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Rangeland Ecology & Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform August 2020
dc.source.volume61
dc.source.issue5
dc.source.beginpage496-508
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-05T07:13:17Z


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