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dc.contributor.authorWarner, Echo L
dc.contributor.authorVaca Lopez, Perla L
dc.contributor.authorKepka, Deanna
dc.contributor.authorMann, Karely
dc.contributor.authorKaddas, Heydon K
dc.contributor.authorFair, Douglas
dc.contributor.authorFluchel, Mark
dc.contributor.authorKnackstedt, Elizabeth D
dc.contributor.authorPannier, Samantha T
dc.contributor.authorMartel, Laura
dc.contributor.authorKirchhoff, Anne C
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-16T20:00:57Z
dc.date.available2020-09-16T20:00:57Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-26
dc.identifier.citationWarner, E.L., Vaca Lopez, P.L., Kepka, D. et al. Influence of provider recommendations to restart vaccines after childhood cancer on caregiver intention to vaccinate. J Cancer Surviv 14, 757–767 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11764-020-00890-yen_US
dc.identifier.pmid32458248
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11764-020-00890-y
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/643354
dc.description.abstractPurpose We studied the influence of oncology and primary care provider (PCP) recommendations on caregiver intentions to restart vaccines (e.g., catch-up or boosters) after cancer treatment. Methods We surveyed primary caregivers ages 18 or older with a child who had completed cancer treatment 3-36 months prior (N= 145) about demographics, child's vaccination status, and healthcare factors (e.g., provider recommendations, barriers, preferences for vaccination). We compared these factors by caregiver's intention to restart vaccines ("vaccine intention" vs. "no intent to vaccinate") using bivariate and multivariable analyses. Results Caregivers were primarily ages 30-39 years (54.9%), mothers (80.6%), college graduates (44.4%), non-Hispanic (89.2%), and married (88.2%). Overall, 34.5% of caregivers did not know which vaccines their child needed. However, 65.5% of caregivers reported vaccine intention. Fewer caregivers with no intention to vaccinate believed that vaccinating their child helps protect others (85.4 vs. 99.0%,p< 0.01), that vaccines are needed when diseases are rare (83.7 vs. 100.0%,p< 0.01), and that vaccines are safe (80.4 vs. 92.6%,p= 0.03) and effective (91.5 vs. 98.9%,p= 0.04) compared with vaccine intention caregivers, respectively. Provider recommendations increased caregivers' likelihood of vaccine intention (oncologist RR = 1.65, 95% CI 1.27-2.12,p< 0.01; PCP RR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.19-1.94,p< 0.01). Conclusions Provider recommendations positively influence caregivers' intention to restart vaccines after childhood cancer. Guidelines are needed to support providers in making tailored vaccine recommendations. Implications for Cancer Survivors Timely vaccination after childhood cancer protects patients against vaccine-preventable diseases during survivorship. Caregivers may benefit from discussing restarting vaccinations after cancer with healthcare providers.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSPRINGERen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © Springer Science + Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2020.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subjectCaregiveren_US
dc.subjectchildhooden_US
dc.subjectImmunizationen_US
dc.subjectProvider recommendationen_US
dc.subjectSurvivorship careen_US
dc.titleInfluence of provider recommendations to restart vaccines after childhood cancer on caregiver intention to vaccinateen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1932-2267
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Canc Ctren_US
dc.identifier.journalJournal of cancer survivorship : research and practiceen_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; published 26 May 2020en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of cancer survivorship : research and practice
dc.source.volume14
dc.source.issue5
dc.source.beginpage757
dc.source.endpage767
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States


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