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dc.contributor.authorMajak, Walter
dc.contributor.authorSteinke, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorMcGillivray, Jason
dc.contributor.authorLysyk, Tim
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-18T04:48:09Z
dc.date.available2020-09-18T04:48:09Z
dc.date.issued2004-05-01
dc.identifier.citationMajak, W., Steinke, D., McGillivray, J., & Lysyk, T. (2004). Clinical signs in cattle grazing high molybdenum forage. Journal of Range Management, 57(3), 269-274.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409X
dc.identifier.doi10.2111/1551-5028(2004)057[0269:CSICGH]2.0.CO;2
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/4003795
dc.identifier.doi10.2458/azu_jrm_v57i3_majak
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/643535
dc.description.abstractRevegetation and sustainable cattle grazing are major objectives in the reclamation of mine tailings at the Highland Valley Copper mine in British Columbia, Canada. A total of 84 cow-calf pairs grazed forage extremely high in molybdenum (Mo) for 11 weeks in the summer and fall for 3 consecutive years (1999-2001). The average stocking rate was 0.63 ha AUM-1. The animals' diet consisted primarily of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) containing 100-400 ppm Mo. Both cows and calves showed adequate daily gains of 0.78 kg head-1 day-1 and 1.33 kg head-1 day-1, respectively. Uptake of Mo was demonstrated by elevated levels of Mo in rumen contents and feces. Clinical signs of Mo toxicity were observed in less than half of the cows and in only a few calves. Clinical signs included a stiff shuffling gait, watery diarrhea, and a rough hair coat. Lameness, the primary sign, was resolved in all animals by the end of each trial. Diarrhea was also resolved by the end of the trial and hair coats returned to normal by the following spring. The onset and severity of the affliction appeared to be related to prevailing moisture conditions, which may have affected Mo availability in forage. Some affected animals were treated with Cu injections to no avail. Liver biopsies and serum samples showed marginal to adequate copper (Cu) levels but potentially toxic levels of Mo. In the third year of the trial, Cu-containing boluses were employed but they did not prevent the onset of clinical signs.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectmine tailings reclamation
dc.subjectliver copper status
dc.subjectmolybdenum
dc.subjectcopper boluses
dc.titleClinical signs in cattle grazing high molybdenum forage
dc.typetext
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Range Management
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Journal of Range Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform August 2020
dc.source.volume57
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage269-274
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-18T04:48:09Z


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