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dc.contributor.authorEneboe, E. J.
dc.contributor.authorSowell, B. F.
dc.contributor.authorHeitschmidt, R. K.
dc.contributor.authorKarl, M. G.
dc.contributor.authorHaferkamp, M. R.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-18T04:59:40Z
dc.date.available2020-09-18T04:59:40Z
dc.date.issued2002-03-01
dc.identifier.citationEneboe, E. J., Sowell, B. F., Heitschmidt, R. K., Karl, M. G., & Haferkamp, M. R. (2002). Drought and grazing. IV. Blue grama and western wheatgrass. Journal of Range Management, 55(2), 197-203.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409X
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/4003357
dc.identifier.doi10.2458/azu_jrm_v55i2_eneboe
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/643647
dc.description.abstractAn understanding of the impacts of grazing during and following drought on rangeland ecosystems is critical for developing effective drought management strategies. This study was designed to examine the effects of drought and grazing on blue grama [Bouteloua gracilis (H.B.K) Lag. ex Griffiths] and western wheatgrass [Pascopyrum smithii Rydb. (Love)] tiller growth dynamics. Research was conducted from 1993 to 1996 at the Fort Keogh Livestock and Range Research Laboratory located near Miles City, Mont. An automated rainout shelter was used during 1994 to impose a severe late spring to early fall (May to October) drought on 6 of twelve, 5- x 10-m non-weighing lysimeters. Twice replicated grazing treatments were: 1) grazed both the year of (1994) and the year after (1995) drought; 2) grazed the year of and rested the year after drought; and 3) no grazing either year. Drought had minimal impact on tiller relative growth rates of plants grazed twice, although it reduced (P less than or equal to 0.01) rates of axillary tiller emergence for blue grama (79%) and western wheatgrass (91%). Defoliation periodically increased relative growth rates (P less than or equal to 0.05) and tiller emergence (P less than or equal to 0.01) of both species. Neither drought nor grazing affected tiller densities or tiller replacement rates of either species nor did they affect productivity of blue grama. Drought, however, reduced (P less than or equal to 0.01) productivity of western wheatgrass 50% in 1994 whereas grazing reduced productivity (P less than or equal to 0.01) by 46% in 1994 and 69% in 1995. Moderate stocking levels (40-50% utilization) during and after drought did not adversely affect the sustainability of these dominant native grasses.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectpascopyron smithii
dc.subjectprimary productivity
dc.subjectdrought tolerance
dc.subjectstocking rate
dc.subjectPascopyrum smithii
dc.subjectBouteloua gracilis
dc.subjecttillering
dc.subjectgrowth rate
dc.subjectleaf water potential
dc.subjectxylem water potential
dc.subjectdrought injury
dc.subjecttillers
dc.subjectbiomass production
dc.subjectMontana
dc.subjectgrazing
dc.subjectsoil water
dc.subjectwater stress
dc.subjectBouteloua gracilis
dc.subjectPascopyrum smithii
dc.subjectproduction
dc.subjectrainout shelter
dc.subjectrest
dc.subjectwater potential
dc.titleDrought and grazing: IV. Blue grama and western wheatgrass
dc.typetext
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Range Management
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Journal of Range Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform August 2020
dc.source.volume55
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage197-203
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-18T04:59:40Z


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