Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTate, K. W.
dc.contributor.authorAtwill, E. R.
dc.contributor.authorGeorge, M. R.
dc.contributor.authorMcDougald, N. K.
dc.contributor.authorLarsen, R. E.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-18T14:55:34Z
dc.date.available2020-09-18T14:55:34Z
dc.date.issued2000-05-01
dc.identifier.citationTate, K. W., Atwill, E. R., George, M. R., McDougald, N. K., & Larsen, R. E. (2000). Cryptosporidium parvum transport from cattle fecal deposits on California rangelands. Journal of Range Management, 53(3), 295-299.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409X
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/4003435
dc.identifier.doi10.2458/azu_jrm_v53i3_tate
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/643764
dc.description.abstractCryptosporidium parvumis a fecal borne protozoan parasite that can be carried by and cause gastrointestinal illness in humans, cattle, and wildlife. The illness, cryptosporidiosis, can be fatal to persons with compromised immune systems. At question is the potential for C. parvumin cattle fecal deposits on rangeland watersheds to contaminate surface water. First, C. parvum oocysts must be released from fecal deposits during rainfall, becoming available for transport. In 1996, we examined the transport of C. parvum oocysts in overland flow from fecal deposits under natural rainfall and rangeland conditions at the San Joaquin Experimental Range in Madera County, Calif. Our null hypothesis was that C. parvum oocysts are not released from fecal pats and transported 1 m downslope as overland flow with rainfall. Paired plots were located on 10, 20, and 30% slope sites.Each plot was loaded with four, 200 g fecal pats dosed with 10^5 oocysts g-1. Pats were placed 1.0 m above the base of each plot. Composite runoff samples from each plot were analyzed foroocyst concentration following each of 4 storm events. Oocysts were transported during each storm. Slope was a significant factor in oocyst transport, with oocyst transport increasing with slope. Although not significant, there was an apparent flushing effect of oocysts across storms, with the majority transported in the first 2 storms. A pilot rainfall simulation experiment also revealed a flushing phenomenon from pats during individual rainfall events. C. parvum oocysts in fecal pats on rangeland can be transported from fecal deposits during rainfall events, becoming available for transport to water-bodies. Future studies need to examine surface and subsurface transport of oocysts on rangeland hillslopes for distances greater than 1 m.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectmovement
dc.subjectCryptosporidium parvum
dc.subjectoocysts
dc.subjectzoonoses
dc.subjectwater flow
dc.subjectoverland flow
dc.subjectrain
dc.subjectcattle manure
dc.subjectslope
dc.subjectCalifornia
dc.subjectrangelands
dc.subjectpathogens
dc.subjectwater quality
dc.subjectfate and transport
dc.subjectbuffer strips
dc.titleCryptosporidium parvum transport from cattle fecal deposits on California rangelands
dc.typetext
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Range Management
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Journal of Range Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform August 2020
dc.source.volume53
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage295-299
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-18T14:55:35Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
9519-9400-1-PB.pdf
Size:
59.18Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record