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dc.contributor.authorMalo, J. E.
dc.contributor.authorJiménez, B.
dc.contributor.authorSuarez, F.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-18T14:55:52Z
dc.date.available2020-09-18T14:55:52Z
dc.date.issued2000-05-01
dc.identifier.citationMalo, J. E., Jiménez, B., & Suarez, F. (2000). Herbivore dunging and endozoochorous seed deposition in a Mediterranean dehesa. Journal of Range Management, 53(3), 322-328.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409X
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/4003440
dc.identifier.doi10.2458/azu_jrm_v53i3_malo
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/643769
dc.description.abstractSpatial patterns of herbivore defecation within grazing systems are important as they directly affect pasture growth and composition. These effects are partially linked to seed dispersal in dung, a little studied process. This paper focuses on: (i) quantification of dung and seeds deposited by herbivores in a Mediterranean grazing system, and (ii) analysis of the spatial variability of dung and seeds deposited within and among plant communities. We carried out year-long monthly quantifications of the depositions of rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), fallow deer (Dama dama), red deer (Cervus elaphus), and cow (Bos taurus) dung to 32 plots distributed in Quercus rotundifolia Lam. and Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl woodlands, mixed scrub, and Cistus ladanifer L. scrub. We also quantified the germinable seed content of dung. The results revealed differences (p < 0.05) in dung deposition, varying (I) among the 4 species, (ii) within species (except for the red deer) among plant communities, and (iii) within plant communities. An average of 735 seeds/m2 were returned to the soil via dung, with the highest numbers in open woodlands (870–1,888 seeds/m2) and the lowest numbers in scrubs (83–315 seeds/m2). Cows dispersed the most seeds (68%), followed by red deer (20%), rabbits (7%), and fallow deer (5%). Spatial variability in deposition led to accumulations of up to several thousand seeds at points covered by the dung. The effect of seed input to the seed bank and on vegetation may be low at large and medium-sized spatial scales, but it can be very important at small scales and for colonization processes.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectOryctolagus cuniculus
dc.subjectQuercus ilex subsp. rotundifolia
dc.subjectFraxinus angustifolia
dc.subjectCistus ladanifer
dc.subjectrabbit droppings
dc.subjectextensive livestock farming
dc.subjectSpain
dc.subjectshrublands
dc.subjectseed banks
dc.subjectseed dispersal
dc.subjectwoodland grasslands
dc.subjectspatial variation
dc.subjectCervus elaphus
dc.subjectcattle manure
dc.subjectdefecation
dc.subjectfeces
dc.subjectspecies differences
dc.subjectplant communities
dc.subjectCervus dama
dc.subjectspatial distribution
dc.subjectseed germination
dc.subjectbeef cattle
dc.subjectspatial patterns
dc.subjectdispersal
dc.subjectdung
dc.subjectherbivores
dc.subjectendozoochory
dc.subjectMediterranean pastures
dc.titleHerbivore dunging and endozoochorous seed deposition in a Mediterranean dehesa
dc.typetext
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Range Management
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Journal of Range Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform August 2020
dc.source.volume53
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage322-328
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-18T14:55:52Z


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