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dc.contributor.authorHalstead, L. E.
dc.contributor.authorHowery, L. D.
dc.contributor.authorRuyle, G. B.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-18T15:05:22Z
dc.date.available2020-09-18T15:05:22Z
dc.date.issued2000-09-01
dc.identifier.citationHalstead, L. E., Howery, L. D., & Ruyle, G. B. (2000). Comparison of 3 techniques for monitoring use of western wheatgrass. Journal of Range Management, 53(5), 499-505.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409X
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/4003650
dc.identifier.doi10.2458/azu_jrm_v53i5_halstead
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/643795
dc.description.abstractForage use data can help rangeland and wildlife managers make informed decisions. However, managers need to know if forage use techniques that are commonly used to estimate ungulate herbivory under field conditions produce comparable results. The objective of this 2-year study was to directly compare forage use measurements obtained via the paired-plot method and 2 height-weight methods (using on-site height-weight curves and the pre-established United States Forest Service height-weight gauge). In June, July, and October of 1997 and 1998, we measured forage use of western wheatgrass (Pascopyrum smithii Rydb.) by cattle (Bos taurus L.) and wild ungulates, mainly elk (Cervus elaphus L.). On-site height-weight curves and the USFS gauge consistently produced lower estimates (overall means = 8 and 7%, respectively) than the paired-plot method (overall mean = 31%). Height-weight estimates did not differ (P > 0.05) when calculated with either on-site curves or the USFS gauge. Within sampling areas, paired-plot estimates were relatively more precise (mean CV = 63%) than on-site curves (mean CV = 238%) or the USFS gauge (mean CV = 271%). Selective grazing likely contributed to higher CVs for height-weight techniques. Our findings are important for rangeland and wildlife managers because the forage monitoring technique they use may influence the results obtained and, consequently, grazing management and wildlife harvest decisions. Managers should ensure that chosen monitoring techniques provide an appropriate evaluation of management goals and objectives.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectexperimental plots
dc.subjectheight-weight curve methods
dc.subjectpaired-plot method
dc.subjectgrowth curve
dc.subjectregression analysis
dc.subjectequations
dc.subjectCervus elaphus
dc.subjectselective grazing
dc.subjectPascopyrum smithii
dc.subjectbiomass
dc.subjectrange management
dc.subjectbeef cattle
dc.subjectforage
dc.subjectplant height
dc.subjectArizona
dc.subjectheight-weight
dc.subjectherbivory
dc.subjectpaired-plot
dc.subjectstubble height
dc.titleComparison of 3 techniques for monitoring use of western wheatgrass
dc.typetext
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Range Management
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Journal of Range Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform August 2020
dc.source.volume53
dc.source.issue5
dc.source.beginpage499-505
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-18T22:04:08Z


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