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dc.contributor.authorBai, Y.
dc.contributor.authorThompson, D.
dc.contributor.authorBroersma, K.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-23T05:18:43Z
dc.date.available2020-09-23T05:18:43Z
dc.date.issued2000-09-01
dc.identifier.citationBai, Y., Thompson, D., & Broersma, K. (2000). Early establishment of Douglas-fir and ponderosa pine in grassland seedbeds. Journal of Range Management, 53(5), 511-517.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409X
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/4003652
dc.identifier.doi10.2458/azu_jrm_v53i5_bai
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/643802
dc.description.abstractGrassland of interior British Columbia are being encroached upon by Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca (Beissn.) Franco) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl.). A pot experiment placed in the field was conducted to determine the effect of forest and grassland seedbeds on seedling emergence and early establishment of the 2 species with 2 seed collections each. For these seedbeds, structural characteristics were evaluated and the effect of seedbeds water extracts on seed germination was determined. Seedling emergence of both species was significantly reduced by Douglas-fir needles and enhanced by fescue litter and cattle manure compared to mineral soil. The rate of emergence was reduced by Douglas-fir needles and sagebrush litter, and for some collections, by ponderosa pine needles, but was always enhanced by manure compared to mineral soil. Seedling survival was generally not affected by seedbeds. Douglas-fir seedlings emerging earlier in the season survived better, and both Douglas-fir and ponderosa pine seedlings emerging earlier lived longer than these emerging later. Seed germination of ponderosa pine was not affected by the water extract while that of Douglas-fir was reduced by the water extract from sagebrush litter. Therefore, differences in seedling emergence of the 2 species among seedbeds were related more to structural than to chemical characteristics of seedbeds. Successful establishment of the 2 species in grasslands within this region likely relies on the ability of seeds to germinate early in the growing season on seedbeds in which soil moisture is conserved, as summer droughts are severe.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectlongevity
dc.subjectseedbeds
dc.subjectconifer needles
dc.subjectBritish Columbia
dc.subjectseedling emergence
dc.subjectPinus ponderosa
dc.subjectallelopathy
dc.subjectecological succession
dc.subjectmortality
dc.subjectPseudotsuga menziesii
dc.subjectseedlings
dc.subjectseed germination
dc.subjectestablishment
dc.subjectplant litter
dc.subjectallelopathy
dc.subjectlitter structure
dc.subjectseedbed ecology
dc.subjectPinus ponderosa Dougl.
dc.subjectPseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca (Beissn.)
dc.subjectFranco
dc.titleEarly establishment of Douglas-fir and ponderosa pine in grassland seedbeds
dc.typetext
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Range Management
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Journal of Range Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform August 2020
dc.source.volume53
dc.source.issue5
dc.source.beginpage511-517
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-23T05:18:43Z


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