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dc.contributor.authorPfister, J. A.
dc.contributor.authorPanter, K. E.
dc.contributor.authorGardner, D. R.
dc.contributor.authorStegelmeier, B. L.
dc.contributor.authorRalphs, M. H.
dc.contributor.authorMolyneux, R. J.
dc.contributor.authorLee, S. T.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-23T05:21:58Z
dc.date.available2020-09-23T05:21:58Z
dc.date.issued2001-07-01
dc.identifier.citationPfister, J. A., Panter, K. E., Gardner, D. R., Stegelmeier, B. L., Ralphs, M. H., Molyneux, R. J., & Lee, S. T. (2001). Alkaloids as anti-quality factors in plants on western US rangelands. Journal of Range Management, 54(4), 447-461.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409X
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/4003116
dc.identifier.doi10.2458/azu_jrm_v54i4_pfister
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/643893
dc.description.abstractAlkaloids constitute the largest class of plant secondary compounds, occurring in 20 to 30% of perennial herbaceous species in North America. Alkaloid-containing plants are of interest, first because alkaloids often have pronounced physiological reactions when ingested by livestock, and second because alkaloids have distinctive taste characteristics. Thus, alkaloids may kill, injure, or reduce productivity of livestock, and have the potential to directly or indirectly alter diet selection. We review 7 major categories of toxic alkaloids, including pyrrolizidine (e.g., Senecio), quinolizidine (e.g., Lupinus), indolizidine (e.g., Astragalus), diterpenoid (e.g., Delphinium), piperidine (e.g., Conium), pyridine (e.g., Nicotiana), and steroidal (Veratrum-type) alkaloids. Clinically, effects on animal production vary from minimal feed refusal to abortion, birth defects, wasting diseases, agalactia, and death. There are marked species differences in reactions to alkaloids. This has been attributed to rumen metabolism, alkaloid absorption, metabolism, excretion or directly related to their affinity to target tissues such as binding at receptor sites. In spite of alkaloids reputed bitter taste to livestock, some alkaloid-containing plant genera (e.g., Delphinium, Veratrum, Astragalus, Oxytropis, and Lupinus) are often readily ingested by livestock. Management schemes to prevent losses are usually based on recognizing the particular toxic plant, knowing the mechanism of toxicity, and understanding the temporal dynamics of plant alkaloid concentration and consumption by livestock. Once these aforementioned aspects are understood, losses may be reduced by maintaining optimal forage conditions, adjusting grazing pressure and timing of grazing, aversive conditioning, strategic supplementation, changing livestock species, and herbicidal control.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectbinding
dc.subjectmorbidity
dc.subjectphysiology
dc.subjectmetabolism
dc.subjectexcretion
dc.subjectantinutritional factors
dc.subjectalkaloids
dc.subjecttoxicity
dc.subjectphytotoxins
dc.subjectmortality
dc.subjectstocking rate
dc.subjectselective grazing
dc.subjectspecies differences
dc.subjectrotational grazing
dc.subjectfeed supplements
dc.subjectbiomass production
dc.subjectrumen fermentation
dc.subjectrangelands
dc.subjectpasture plants
dc.subjectliterature reviews
dc.subjectchemical constituents of plants
dc.subjectpoisonous plants
dc.subjectplant toxins
dc.subjectforage quality
dc.subjectdiet selection
dc.subjectgrazing management
dc.titleAlkaloids as anti-quality factors in plants on western U.S. rangelands
dc.typetext
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Range Management
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Journal of Range Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform August 2020
dc.source.volume54
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpage447-461
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-23T05:21:59Z


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