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dc.contributor.authorFuhlendorf, S. D.
dc.contributor.authorSmeins, F. E.
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, C. A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-23T05:52:11Z
dc.date.available2020-09-23T05:52:11Z
dc.date.issued1997-09-01
dc.identifier.citationFuhlendorf, S. D., Smeins, F. E., & Taylor, C. A. (1997). Browsing and tree size influences on Ashe juniper understory. Journal of Range Management, 50(5), 507-512.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409X
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/4003706
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/644060
dc.description.abstractAshe juniper (Junius ashei, Buckholz) is increasing on most sites across the Edwards Plateau of Texas. It is the purpose of this investigation to document the influence of Ashe juniper tree size on understory vegetation and to evaluate how the interaction between tree size and browsing by domestic and white-tailed deer modifies overstory-understory relationships. Trees were randomly selected from 2 long-term treatments (browsed and unbrowsed) and analysed with univariate analysis of covariance and multivariate repeated-measures analysis. Without browsing, Ashe juniper is more abundant and its individual influence increases as the size of the tree increases; trees with a canopy diameter < 6.0 m expressed minimal influence on understory vegetation compared to larger trees. When browsers are present at sufficient stocking rates to create a browse line on large trees, encroachment of Ashe juniper is slowed, rate of increase of all woody speces is reduced, and large trees cause a shift in species composition directly under the canopy, however cover of all herbaceous species is not reduced. Immediately under the canopy of small browsed trees, herbaceous cover is lower than for unbrowsed trees. Environmental variables rpsponsible for these patterns were litter depth and light penetrating the canopy when the sun is at an angle (during the winter). The increased cover of several herbaceous species under the canopy of large browsed trees and at the canopy edge of browsed and unbrowsed trees, indicates the importance of the interaction between canopy cover and the presence of a browse line. Browse lines on large trees enhance growth and production of cool season species, such as Texas wintergrass (Stipa leucotricha Trin. & Rupr.) and reduce negative influences (low light, thick leaf litter, etc.) on other herbaceous species. At this level of browsing many other palatable species could be reduced or lost from the plant comunity.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectbrowse line
dc.subjectlight penetration
dc.subjectsize
dc.subjectJuniperus ashei
dc.subjectunderstory
dc.subjectOdocoileus virginianus
dc.subjectstocking rate
dc.subjectgoats
dc.subjectTexas
dc.subjectplant litter
dc.subjectbotanical composition
dc.subjectcanopy
dc.subjectbrowsing
dc.subjectgrasses
dc.titleBrowsing and tree size influences on Ashe juniper understory
dc.typetext
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Range Management
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Journal of Range Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform August 2020
dc.source.volume50
dc.source.issue5
dc.source.beginpage507-512
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-23T05:52:11Z


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