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dc.contributor.authorde Alba Becerra, R.
dc.contributor.authorWinder, J.
dc.contributor.authorHolechek, J. L.
dc.contributor.authorCardenas, M.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-23T05:53:33Z
dc.date.available2020-09-23T05:53:33Z
dc.date.issued1998-05-01
dc.identifier.citationde Alba Becerra, R., Winder, J., Holechek, J. L., & Cardenas, M. (1998). Diets of 3 cattle breeds on Chihuahuan Desert rangeland. Journal of Range Management, 51(3), 270-275.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409X
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/4003410
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/644078
dc.description.abstractDiet botanical composition, fecal nitrogen percent, and fecal phosphorus percent were determined seasonally during 1991 and 1992 for 3 cattle breeds (Barzona, Brangus, Beefmaster) grazing late-seral Chihuahuan Desert rangeland in southcentral New Mexico. These 3 cattle breeds are considered to be well adapted to harsh environments. Cattle breed main effect was non-significant (P > 0.05) for diet botanical composition. However, season main effects (P < 0.05) did occur for some diet botanical composition components. Total grasses in cattle diets were highest in January and lowest in June. Dropseeds (Sporobolus sp.), black grama (Bouteloua eriopoda Torr.), and threeawns (Aristida sp.) were the primary grasses consumed by cattle. Forb consumption was highest in June lowest in January. Honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa Torr.) consumption by cattle was highest in August and lowest in January. It was the primary shrub in cattle diets. Breed X season interactions (P < 0.05) occurred for a few diet botanical composition components, but the small magnitude of the values and lack of consistency prevented drawing definite management implications. Fecal nitrogen values showed differences (P < 0.05) among breeds in some seasons. However due to lack of consistency no definite conclusions could be drawn regarding superiority of 1 breed compared to another in diet nutritional quality. Both fecal nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations showed cattle diets to be lowest in quality in winter and highest in summer. From a practical standpoint, this study showed no definite advantage of any breed studied in diet botanical composition or in diet quality.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectrain
dc.subjectBrangus
dc.subjectBeefmaster
dc.subjectbeef breeds
dc.subjectbarzona
dc.subjectselective grazing
dc.subjectbreed differences
dc.subjectcattle
dc.subjectseasonal variation
dc.subjectbotanical composition
dc.subjectNew Mexico
dc.titleDiets of 3 cattle breeds on Chihuahuan Desert rangeland
dc.typetext
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Range Management
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Journal of Range Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform August 2020
dc.source.volume51
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage270-275
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-23T05:53:33Z


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