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dc.contributor.authorKloppenburg, P. B.
dc.contributor.authorKiesling, H. E.
dc.contributor.authorKirksey, R. E.
dc.contributor.authorDonart, G. B.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-23T17:49:09Z
dc.date.available2020-09-23T17:49:09Z
dc.date.issued1995-11-01
dc.identifier.citationKloppenburg, P. B., Kiesling, H. E., Kirksey, R. E., & Donart, G. B. (1995). Forage quality, intake, and digestibility of year-long pastures for steers. Journal of Range Management, 48(6), 542-548.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409X
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/4003067
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/644255
dc.description.abstractThirty-six weanling steer calves (avg wt = 174 +/- 14 kg) were grazed on either wheat, irrigated improved, or native rangeland pastures from December 1989 to December 1990. Irrigated improved pastures consisted of 2 cool-season [tall wheatgrass [Agropyron elongatum (Host.) Beauv.], tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) 2 warm-season [bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.], bluestem (Bothriochloa ischaemum Keng.), and annual wheat. Wheat pastures were grazed from 13 December to 11 April. Warm-season pastures were grazed from 30 May (bermudagrass) or 27 June (bluestem) until 3 October. Cool-season pastures were grazed at other days during spring and fall seasons. Rumen evacuation procedures were used to evaluate forage quality and estimate forage intake during each grazing season. Winter rangeland pastures were lower in nutritional quality (based on protein and fiber contents) and in vitro organic matter digestibility (53 vs 85%, P < 0.05) compared to wheat pasture. During spring, rangeland pastures were still lower in protein and higher in fiber but in vitro organic matter digestibility (72, 73, 72%; respectively, for wheatgrass, fescue and rangeland) was similar (P = 0.70) for all forages. Rangeland and warm-season pastures were similar in quality during summer but rangeland pastures were higher (P< 0.10) in in vitro organic matter digestibility (65, 69, and 73%; respectively, for bermudagrass, bluestem, and rangeland). Rangeland pastures were again lower in quality and digestibility than cool-season grasses during the fall. There were no difference (P>0.10) in organic matter intake (% of body weight) during winter, summer, and fall season but during spring organic matter intake was greater (P < 0.10) for steers on rangeland pasture than for those on cool-season grasses.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectTriticum aestivum
dc.subjectFestuca arundinacea
dc.subjectirrigated pastures
dc.subjectCynodon dactylon
dc.subjectgrassland improvement
dc.subjectliveweight gain
dc.subjectBothriochloa ischaemum
dc.subjectyields
dc.subjectchemical composition
dc.subjectpastures
dc.subjectdiet
dc.subjectsteers
dc.subjectdigestibility
dc.subjectNew Mexico
dc.subjectforage
dc.subjectdry matter
dc.subjectfeed intake
dc.subjectElytrigia elongata
dc.titleForage quality, intake, and digestibility of year-long pastures for steers
dc.typetext
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Range Management
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Journal of Range Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform August 2020
dc.source.volume48
dc.source.issue6
dc.source.beginpage542-548
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-23T17:49:09Z


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