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dc.contributor.authorPfeiffer, K. E.
dc.contributor.authorHartnett, D. C.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-23T18:30:30Z
dc.date.available2020-09-23T18:30:30Z
dc.date.issued1995-01-01
dc.identifier.citationPfeiffer, K. E., & Hartnett, D. C. (1995). Bison selectivity and grazing response of little bluestem in tallgrass prairie. Journal of Range Management, 48(1), 26-31.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409X
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/4002500
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/644360
dc.description.abstractThe perennial bunchgrass little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium [Michx.] Nash) was examined in a 5-yr study on tallgrass prairie to determine how fire influences its use by bison and its responses to grazing. On unburned prairie, bison grazed only 5% of the available little bluestem, selecting it only 30% as frequently as big bluestem, the dominant co-occurring species. On burned prairie, grazing frequency of little bluestem was over 3-fold greater and equal to that of its dominant neighbor. Grazing frequency of little bluestem was affected by plant size (basal area). On burned sites, plants of intermediate size classes were least abundant (< 10% of total) but were grazed most frequently (> 50%). Small plants were most abundant but were grazed least frequently. Density, tiller numbers, and basal area of little bluestem were significantly greater in annually burned compared to infrequently burned sites but were decreased by > 50% in grazed compared to ungrazed sites. Grazing shifted the population size distribution toward higher frequencies of smaller individuals (< 5 0 cm2 basal area), whereas burning increased the frequency of large (> 200 cm2 basal area) individuals. In unburned prairie, little bluestem accumulates a persistent clump of standing dead tillers that appear to serve as a physical deterrent to grazing. Although burning enhances its growth, it also removes its canopy of dead tillers exposing the plant to grazers. The shift in population structure toward a high frequency of smaller (and perhaps less drought- or grazing-tolerant) individuals may contribute to the decline of little bluestem populations under persistent grazing. Thus, plant growth form, population size structure, and fire interact to influence bison grazing patterns and responses of little bluestem to grazing on tallgrass prairie.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectbison
dc.subjectburning
dc.subjectSchizachyrium scoparium
dc.subjectKansas
dc.subjectgrazing experiments
dc.subjectregrowth
dc.subjectplant density
dc.subjectprairies
dc.subjectfeeding preferences
dc.titleBison selectivity and grazing response of little bluestem in tallgrass prairie
dc.typetext
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Range Management
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Journal of Range Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform August 2020
dc.source.volume48
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage26-31
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-23T18:30:30Z


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