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dc.contributor.authorRalphs, M. H.
dc.contributor.authorGraham, D.
dc.contributor.authorJames, L. F.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-23T18:46:10Z
dc.date.available2020-09-23T18:46:10Z
dc.date.issued1994-03-01
dc.identifier.citationRalphs, M. H., Graham, D., & James, L. F. (1994). Social facilitation influences cattle to graze locoweed. Journal of Range Management, 47(2), 123-126.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409X
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/4002819
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/644470
dc.description.abstractMany ranchers claim that if a cow starts eating locoweed, she will teach others to eat it. Three grazing trials were conducted to evaluate the role of social facilitation in starting cattle to graze locoweed. The first trial was conducted near Gladstone, N.M., using mature cows grazing woolly locoweed (Astragalus mollissimus var. mollissimus Torr). The second trial was conducted on the Raft River Mountains in northwestern Utah, using yearling cattle grazing white locoweed (Oxytropis sericea Nutt). The third trial was conducted to determine if aversion-conditioned yearling cattle would consume white locoweed when placed with cattle that were eating locoweed (loco-eaters). Cattle conditioned to eat locoweed and naive animals in trials 1 and 2 first grazed in separate pastures to evaluate their initial acceptance of locoweed. The groups in the respective trials then were placed together to evaluate the influence of social facilitation on locoweed consumption. Locoweed consumption was quantified by bite count. Naive cattle in trials 1 and 2 sampled small quantities of locoweed while grazing separately. However, they greatly increased locoweed consumption when placed with the loco-eaters. Aversion-conditioned cattle in trial 3 did not consume locoweed while grazing separately. When placed with loco-eaters, they gradually increased consumption of white locoweed, in contrast to the immediate acceptance of locoweed by naive cattle in trials 1 and 2. The aversion extinguished and averted animals eventually accepted white locoweed at levels comparable to loco-eaters. Results of this study demonstrate that social facilitation can cause cattle to start eating locoweed.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectbiting rates
dc.subjectconditioned behavior
dc.subjectOxytropis sericea
dc.subjectAstragalus mollissimus
dc.subjectresponses
dc.subjectanimal behavior
dc.subjectcattle
dc.subjectUtah
dc.subjectfeeding preferences
dc.titleSocial facilitation influences cattle to graze locoweed
dc.typetext
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Range Management
dc.description.noteThis material was digitized as part of a cooperative project between the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries.
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Journal of Range Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform August 2020
dc.source.volume47
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage123-126
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-23T18:46:10Z


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