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dc.contributor.authorPfister, J. A.
dc.contributor.authorManners, G. D.
dc.contributor.authorGardner, D. R.
dc.contributor.authorRalphs, M. H.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-23T18:47:37Z
dc.date.available2020-09-23T18:47:37Z
dc.date.issued1994-09-01
dc.identifier.citationPfister, J. A., Manners, G. D., Gardner, D. R., & Ralphs, M. H. (1994). Toxic alkaloid levels in tall larkspur (Delphinium barbeyi) in western Colorado. Journal of Range Management, 47(5), 355-358.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409X
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/4002329
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/644489
dc.description.abstractConsumption of tall larkspur (Delphinium barbeyi L. Huth.) can be fatal to cattle grazing mountain rangeland during summer. Tall larkspur contains many alkaloids, but virtually all the toxicity is caused by methyl succidimido anthranoyl lycoctonine-type (MSAL) diterpenoid alkaloids. We measured the concentration of MSAL alkaloids (% of dry matter) in tall larkspur in various phenological stages during 1990, 1991, and 1992 near Yampa, Colorado. The site represented tall larkspur-infested rangelands on the western slope of the Rocky Mountains. Toxic alkaloid concentrations were greatest (0.4 to 0.6%) early in the growing season (bud stage). Toxic alkaloid concentrations were generally static during the flower and pod stages, or increased during the pod stage. Immature leaves had greater MSAL alkaloid concentrations early in the growing season compared to flowering parts. Alkaloid concentrations in pods were greater than in leaves (P<0.05; pod stage), as pod concentrations increased to 0.4% late in the growing season. In 2 of 3 years, plant parts did not differ in MSAL alkaloid concentrations, although weather conditions differed each year. Concentrations of toxic alkaloids did not seem to influence amounts of tall larkspur consumed by grazing cattle on the same sampling dates. Many livestock producers defer grazing of tall larkspur ranges until the plant is in the pod stage because of a general belief that toxicity is greatly reduced. Our results suggest that grazing tall larkspur ranges during the pod stage may exacerbate cattle losses if MSAL alkaloid concentrations do not decrease, yet consumption by cattle increases.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectconcentration
dc.subject14-deacetylnudicauline
dc.subjectalkaloids
dc.subjectDelphinium barbeyi
dc.subjectgrazing behavior
dc.subjectphenology
dc.subjectColorado
dc.subjectbeef cattle
dc.subjectmethyllycaconitine
dc.titleToxic alkaloid levels in tall larkspur (Delphinium barbeyi) in western Colorado
dc.typetext
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Range Management
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Journal of Range Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform August 2020
dc.source.volume47
dc.source.issue5
dc.source.beginpage355-358
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-23T18:47:37Z


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