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dc.contributor.authorLockwood, J. A.
dc.contributor.authorLockwood, D. R.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-23T19:03:40Z
dc.date.available2020-09-23T19:03:40Z
dc.date.issued1993-07-01
dc.identifier.citationLockwood, J. A., & Lockwood, D. R. (1993). Catastrophe theory: A unified paradigm for rangeland ecosystem dynamics. Journal of Range Management, 46(4), 282-288.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409X
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/4002459
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/644522
dc.description.abstractRangeland ecologists have elucidated 2 apparently distinct processes underlying rangeland dynamics. In some cases, disturbed or recovering rangelands move through a gradual, continuous series of changes which has been termed succession. In other instances, rangeland dynamics are typified by sudden, discontinuous changes in the vegetation, and this has been cared state-and-transition. Catastrophe theory is a mathematical framework designed for the study of discontinuous phenomena, but it also generates models that permit continuous dynamics. Based on available literature, it appears that rangeland ecosystems conform to the mathematics of catastrophe theory. Rangelands exhibit the 5 essential symptoms of catastrophe systems: modality (distinct conditions or states of existence), inaccessibility (conditions which are very unstable), sudden changes (relatively rapid movement between states), hysteresis (processes associated with degradation or recovery are not readily reversible by simply inverting the sequence of events), and divergence (relatively small changes in initial conditions can result in dramatically different outcomes with time). Catastrophe theory has been successfully used to model rangeland grasshopper population dynamics, and it appears that many of the same control variables affecting insects (e.g., temperature and precipitation) may also underlie vegetative community dynamics. Application of catastrophe theory to empirical data sets will require relatively long-term but low-intensity research efforts.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectlandscape ecology
dc.subjectmathematical models
dc.subjectecological succession
dc.subjectrangelands
dc.titleCatastrophe Theory: A unified paradigm for rangeland ecosystem dynamics
dc.typetext
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Range Management
dc.description.noteThis material was digitized as part of a cooperative project between the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries.
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Journal of Range Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform August 2020
dc.source.volume46
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpage282-288
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-23T19:03:40Z


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