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dc.contributor.authorJohnson, H. B.
dc.contributor.authorMayeux, H. S.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-23T20:21:05Z
dc.date.available2020-09-23T20:21:05Z
dc.date.issued1992-07-01
dc.identifier.citationJohnson, H. B., & Mayeux, H. S. (1992). Viewpoint: A view on species additions and deletions and the balance of nature. Journal of Range Management, 45(4), 322-333.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409X
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/4003077
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/644655
dc.description.abstractPopular assumptions about ecosystem stability and the delicate balance of nature are found lacking when examined in terms of paleoecological, historical and current biochronological, and biogeographical sequences in a wide variety of environments. Species composition of vegetation varies continuously in time as well as space in the absence of acute perturbations. Species have been added to or removed from ecosystems without greatly affecting ecosystem function. Natural ecosystems exhibit greater stability (inertia) in physiognomic structure and functional processes than in species composition. For instance, creosotebush became dominant over many millions of hectares of the Chihuahuan, Sonoran, and Mojave Deserts over a short period of 11,000 years, but a limited number of generations precludes establishment of highly integrated and biologically regulated communities by co-evolution. Dramatic shifts in species composition of eastern deciduous forests of North America occurred in prehistory and continue into the present. Similar changes are noted in the constant assembling and reassembling of species in the purportedly ancient and stable forests of the tropics. Numerous introductions with few extinctions in the flora of California have increased species richness and probably diversity, and many recent additions are primary contributors to ecosystem productivity. Recognition that rangeland ecosystems persist in unstable rather than stable species compositions provides both a challenge and an opportunity for natural resource management. The challenge is to develop new management principles that incorporate nonequilibrium theory. The opportunity is the promotion of policies and regulations that more closely reflect reality.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectbiogeography
dc.subjectextinction
dc.subjectLarrea tridentata
dc.subjectweeds
dc.subjectecosystems
dc.subjectbiological control
dc.subjectevolution
dc.subjectpaleoecology
dc.subjectclimax communities
dc.subjectvegetation management
dc.subjectplant ecology
dc.subjectpopulation dynamics
dc.subjectvegetation
dc.subjectbotanical composition
dc.titleViewpoint: A view on species additions and deletions and the balance of nature
dc.typetext
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Range Management
dc.description.noteThis material was digitized as part of a cooperative project between the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries.
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Journal of Range Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform August 2020
dc.source.volume45
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpage322-333
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-23T20:21:05Z


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