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dc.contributor.authorUeckert, D. N.
dc.contributor.authorPetersen, J. L.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-24T02:16:50Z
dc.date.available2020-09-24T02:16:50Z
dc.date.issued1991-05-01
dc.identifier.citationUeckert, D. N., & Petersen, J. L. (1991). Selecting Atriplex canescens for greater tolerance to competition. Journal of Range Management, 44(3), 220-227.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409X
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/4002945
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/644781
dc.description.abstractSuccess in establishing fourwing saltbush [Atriplex canescens (Pursh) Nutt.] is often limited by competition from associated vegetation. Fourwing saltbush is reported to have abundant natural genetic variation, hence selection for plant vigor or competitiveness may be an effective tool for cultivar improvement. We observed distinctive within-accession variation in the apparent ability of fourwing saltbush seedlings to tolerate competition from sideoats grama [Bouteloua curtipendula (Michx.) Torr.] in a 1982 field planting. Superior and inferior parental saltbush phenotypes in the field planting were cloned in 1984 by rooting stem cuttings, and the cloned propagules were transplanted into plots with or without competition to test the hypothesis that the competitiveness trait was genetically controlled. Survival and canopy development of superior and inferior clones planted at the same time in competition regimens were similar, suggesting that the parental phenotypes were not genetically different in their ability to tolerate competition. Differences observed in the parental phenotypes may have been environmentally induced, or genetic differences in the clonal material may have been masked by using rooted cuttings rather than seedlings, by excessive competitive pressure in the competition regimens utilized, or both. Clones from the 2 parental phenotypes performed similarly when transplanted into competition-free regimens in November when growing conditions were favorable, but canopy development of clones from superior parental phenotypes exceeded that of those from inferior parental phenotypes when transplanted into competition-free regimens in April when growing conditions were poor.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectphenotypic selection
dc.subjectphenotypic stability
dc.subjectgenetic regulation
dc.subjectphenotype
dc.subjectcrop establishment
dc.subjectplant cuttings
dc.subjectBouteloua curtipendula
dc.subjectcompetitive ability
dc.subjectAtriplex canescens
dc.subjectenvironmental factors
dc.subjectplant competition
dc.titleSelecting Atriplex canescens for greater tolerance to competition
dc.typetext
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Range Management
dc.description.noteThis material was digitized as part of a cooperative project between the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries.
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Journal of Range Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform August 2020
dc.source.volume44
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage220-227
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-24T02:16:50Z


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