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dc.contributor.authorWalker, J. W.
dc.contributor.authorHeitschmidt, R. K.
dc.contributor.authorDowhower, S. L.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-24T02:59:39Z
dc.date.available2020-09-24T02:59:39Z
dc.date.issued1989-03-01
dc.identifier.citationWalker, J. W., Heitschmidt, R. K., & Dowhower, S. L. (1989). Some effects of a rotational grazing treatment on cattle preference for plant communities. Journal of Range Management, 42(2), 143-148.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409X
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/3899312
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/645084
dc.description.abstractRotational grazing is commonly assumed to improve livestock distribution compared to continuous grazing, but little evidence supports this contention. Research was conducted on the effects of rotational grazing (RG) compared to continuous grazing (CG) on the preference of cattle for plant communities. Different livestock densities in the RG treatments were created by varying the size of paddocks in a 465-ha, 16-paddock, cell designed RG treatment stocked at a rate of 3.6 ha/cow/yr. Paddock sizes of 30 and 10-ha were used to simulate RG with 14 (RG-14) and 42-paddocks (RG-42), respectively. The CG treatment consisted of a 248-ha pasture stocked at 5.9 ha/cow/yr. Data consisted of hourly daylight observations of cattle location and activity during 8 seasonal trials lasting 6-15 days. These data were expressed as a percent of the time cattle were observed in each of 4 plant communities and the area surrounding permanent water. Relative electivity (RE), a preference index, and a selectivity index (SI) that measures departures from random distribution were calculated from these data. Relative electivity (i.e., preference) for plant communities was not affected by grazing treatment. However, cattle were less selective for plant communities as livestock density decreased from the RG-42 to the CG treatment. In the RG-14 treatment, the cattle were either unaffected or less selective on the last day than on the first day in a paddock. We hypothesize that grazing systems influence cattle preference for plant communities by affecting the availability of forage biomass per unit land area rather than by their effect on grazing pressure.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectrotational grazing
dc.subjectTexas
dc.subjectgrasses
dc.subjectbeef cattle
dc.subjectfeeding preferences
dc.titleSome effects of a rotational grazing treatment on cattle preference for plant communities
dc.typetext
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Range Management
dc.description.noteThis material was digitized as part of a cooperative project between the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries.
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Journal of Range Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform August 2020
dc.source.volume42
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage143-148
refterms.dateFOA2020-09-24T02:59:39Z


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