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dc.contributor.authorTaylor-Piliae, Ruth E
dc.contributor.authorZeimantz, Melinda A
dc.contributor.authorDolan, Hanne
dc.contributor.authorRosenfeld, Anne G
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-20T22:54:10Z
dc.date.available2020-10-20T22:54:10Z
dc.date.issued2020-09
dc.identifier.citationTaylor-Piliae, R. E., Zeimantz, M. A., Dolan, H., & Rosenfeld, A. G. (2020). Stroke Survivors' Feelings and Perceptions of Their Recovery After a Tai Chi Exercise Intervention: A Qualitative Descriptive Study. Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 35(5), 468-474.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0889-4655
dc.identifier.pmid32251038
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/JCN.0000000000000667
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/647702
dc.description.abstractBackground Most tai chi studies conducted among stroke survivors have focused on physical functioning, whereas inclusion of stroke survivors' feelings and perceptions of participating in tai chi is lacking. Objective The aim of this study was to identify stroke survivors' feelings and perceptions of participating in a tai chi intervention during their poststroke recovery. Methods This qualitative descriptive study examined stories from community-dwelling stroke survivors, collected as part of a larger randomized clinical trial. To examine these stories, an inductive content analysis approach was used with a priori theoretical codes (and subcodes): (1) Feelings (confidence, enjoy, hopeful, helpful, other) and (2) Perceptions of Impact (physical abilities, mental/cognitive abilities, challenges, other). Lincoln and Guba's criteria were followed to ensure trustworthiness of the study findings. Results Participants (n = 17) were on average 71 years old (range, 54-87 years), mainly men (65%), and had the option of writing their own story or having someone write it for them. Stories from these stroke survivors revealed feelings of confidence (n = 4), enjoyment (n = 7), hope (n = 1), and helpfulness (n = 15). Perceptions of the impact of tai chi on their poststroke recovery process identified improved physical abilities (n = 23), better mental/cognitive abilities (n = 12), moving forward (n = 7), and developing friendships (n = 4), with few challenges (n = 1). Conclusions Using storytelling, healthcare providers can discuss the benefits of tai chi and then relate the feelings and perceptions of other stroke survivors' experiences to encourage engagement in regular physical activity to aid in the poststroke recovery process.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherLIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINSen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2020 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subjectexerciseen_US
dc.subjectnarrationen_US
dc.subjectqualitative researchen_US
dc.subjectstroke rehabilitationen_US
dc.subjecttai chien_US
dc.titleStroke Survivors' Feelings and Perceptions of Their Recovery After a Tai Chi Exercise Intervention: A Qualitative Descriptive Studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1550-5049
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Nursingen_US
dc.identifier.journalJOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR NURSINGen_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; 01 September 2020en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.source.journaltitleThe Journal of cardiovascular nursing
dc.source.volume35
dc.source.issue5
dc.source.beginpage468
dc.source.endpage474
dc.source.countryUnited States


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