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dc.contributor.authorPavliscak, Laura L.
dc.contributor.authorFehmi, Jeffrey S.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-05T01:23:14Z
dc.date.available2020-11-05T01:23:14Z
dc.date.issued2020-09-23
dc.identifier.citationLaura L. Pavliscak & Jeffrey S. Fehmi (2020) Agave palmeri restoration: salvage and transplantation of population structure, Arid Land Research and Management, DOI: 10.1080/15324982.2020.1821829en_US
dc.identifier.issn1532-4982
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/15324982.2020.1821829
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/648118
dc.description.abstractAgave palmeri (Palmer's agave) is a long-lived, monocarpic, perennial succulent which provides a critical flower nectar food source for the threatened species, Leptonycteris curasoae (lesser long-nosed bat) among other animals. Agave palmeri flower only once after approximately 25 years. To support the demography needed to have some plants flowering every year, wild populations of A. palmeri must be conserved and mining, construction, and recreational impacts must be mitigated. Collecting, storing, and transplanting wild plants was tested as a potential method for restoring and maintaining A. palmeri populations. In January 2009, 387 wild plants were collected, roughly half the plants were potted in field soil, and the remainder were placed in pots without soil (bare-root) and covered with burlap cloth. During 6-months storage, 1% of plants potted in field soil died while 31% of bare-root plants died. In July 2009, a denuded and scarified field plot was planted with the surviving 277 A. palmeri individuals. Plants received one of three water treatments: a 90-day slow-release gel irrigation supplement, 8 L (2 gal) of water, or no water or gel. Three years after transplanting, survivorship was assessed. The watering treatments had no significant effect on survivorship. The number of green leaves at the time of collection was the most important factor in predicting if the plants lived, died, or survived to flower before dying . Mortality is concentrated in the smallest and largest plants. Transplanting appears to be a viable method of returning diverse size classes of A. palmerito disturbed sites.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherInforma UK Limiteden_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2020 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectland reclamationen_US
dc.subjectLeptonycteris curasoaeen_US
dc.subjectPalmer's Agaveen_US
dc.subjectsemi-arid landsen_US
dc.titleAgave palmeri restoration: salvage and transplantation of population structureen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1532-4990
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Sch Nat Resources & Environmen_US
dc.identifier.journalARID LAND RESEARCH AND MANAGEMENTen_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; published online 23 September 2020en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.identifier.pii10.1080/15324982.2020.1821829
dc.source.journaltitleArid Land Research and Management
dc.source.beginpage1
dc.source.endpage12


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