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dc.contributor.authorZhu, Terry
dc.contributor.authorChiacchia, Samuel
dc.contributor.authorKameny, Rebecca J
dc.contributor.authorGarcia De Herreros, Antoni
dc.contributor.authorGong, Wenhui
dc.contributor.authorRaff, Gary W
dc.contributor.authorBoehme, Jason B
dc.contributor.authorMaltepe, Emin
dc.contributor.authorLasheras, Juan C
dc.contributor.authorBlack, Stephen M
dc.contributor.authorDatar, Sanjeev A
dc.contributor.authorFineman, Jeffrey R
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-18T22:53:57Z
dc.date.available2020-11-18T22:53:57Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-14
dc.identifier.citationZhu, T., Chiacchia, S., Kameny, R. J., Garcia De Herreros, A., Gong, W., Raff, G. W., ... & Fineman, J. R. (2020). Mechanical forces alter endothelin-1 signaling: comparative ovine models of congenital heart disease. Pulmonary Circulation, 10(2), 2045894020922118.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2045-8932
dc.identifier.pmid32489641
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/2045894020922118
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/648549
dc.description.abstractAnimals have evolved strategies to identify areas that provide the resources and environmental conditions they need to survive and reproduce. To explore how invasions by nonnative plants might disrupt this fundamental process, we evaluated settlement patterns of migratory birds that breed in grasslands being invaded by two structurally different congeneric grasses. We established 40, 2.25-ha plots across an area where the composition of each nonnative grass ranged from 0% to nearly 100% of total grass cover, which provided individuals with the full range of alternatives in species composition. We then used the temporal sequence by which birds established territories to infer their habitat preferences. We evaluated responses of the most common species that settled the area, two confamilial sparrows that differed markedly in habitat breadth. The species with narrower habitat breadth, the grasshopper sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum ammolegus), first established territories in areas dominated by native grasses, where grass height and cover were substantially lower than in areas dominated by the nonnative grasses. As the settlement period progressed, they increasingly established territories in areas dominated by the smaller nonnative grass (Eragrostis lehmanniana), but never established territories in areas dominated by the larger grass (E. curvula). In contrast, the species with broader habitat breadth, the Botteri's sparrow (Peucaea botterii arizonae), established territories without regard to grass composition, likely because both nonnative grasses were within the structural range of native grasses used by this grassland generalist. Our results demonstrate that in areas invaded by nonnative plants, changes in habitat use by animals can reflect the interaction between their habitat breadth and the amount of structural contrast between invading plants and the native plant species that are displaced. This interaction provides a mechanism to explain the variation in responses among species to invasions by nonnative plants, which has consequences for broad-scale changes in the geographic distribution of many species.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSAGE PUBLICATIONS INCen_US
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2020. Creative Commons Non Commercial CC BY-NC: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectAngiogenesisen_US
dc.subjectApoptosisen_US
dc.subjectpulmonary arterial hypertensionen_US
dc.subjectpulmonary endotheliumen_US
dc.subjectPulmonary hypertensionen_US
dc.titleMechanical forces alter endothelin-1 signaling: comparative ovine models of congenital heart diseaseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Meden_US
dc.identifier.journalPULMONARY CIRCULATIONen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access articleen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitlePulmonary circulation
dc.source.volume10
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage2045894020922118
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States


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© The Author(s) 2020. Creative Commons Non Commercial CC BY-NC: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative
Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is
attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2020. Creative Commons Non Commercial CC BY-NC: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).