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dc.contributor.authorWaldman, Laura Tesler
dc.contributor.authorParthasarathy, Sairam
dc.contributor.authorVilla, Kathleen F
dc.contributor.authorBron, Morgan
dc.contributor.authorBujanover, Shay
dc.contributor.authorBrod, Meryl
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-19T00:37:04Z
dc.date.available2020-11-19T00:37:04Z
dc.date.issued2020-05-07
dc.identifier.citationWaldman, L. T., Parthasarathy, S., Villa, K. F., Bron, M., Bujanover, S., & Brod, M. (2020). Understanding the burden of illness of excessive daytime sleepiness associated with obstructive sleep apnea: a qualitative study. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 18, 1-14.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1477-7525
dc.identifier.pmid32381095
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12955-020-01382-4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/648557
dc.description.abstractBackground Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), which may go undiagnosed and can significantly impair a patient's health-related quality of life (HRQOL). This qualitative research examined timing and reasons patients sought medical care for their EDS and OSA symptoms, and the impact of EDS on HRQOL. Methods Focus groups were conducted in 3 US cities with 42 participants currently experiencing EDS with OSA. Transcripts were coded and analyzed using an adapted grounded theory approach common to qualitative research. Results Over three-fifths of study participants (n=26, 62%) were currently using a positive airway pressure (PAP) or dental device; one-third (n=14, 33%) had previously used a positive airway pressure (PAP) or dental device, and the remainder had either used another treatment (n=1, 2%) or were treatment naive (n=1, 2%). Twenty-two participants (52%) reported experiencing OSA symptoms for >= 1 year, with an average duration of 11.4 (median 8.0, range 1-37) years before seeking medical attention. Several (n=7, 32%) considered their symptoms to be "normal," rather than signaling a serious medical condition. Thirty participants (71%) discussed their reasons for ultimately seeking medical attention, which included: input from spouse/partner, another family member, or friend (n=20, 67%); their own concern about particular symptoms (n=7, 23%); and/or falling asleep while driving (n=5, 17%). For all 42 participants, HRQOL domains impacted by EDS included: physical health and functioning (n=40, 95%); work productivity (n=38, 90%); daily life functioning (n=39, 93%); cognition (n=38, 90%); social life/relationships (n=37, 88%); and emotions (n=30, 71%). Conclusions Findings suggest that patients may be unaware that their symptoms could indicate OSA requiring evaluation and treatment. Even following diagnosis, EDS associated with OSA can continue to substantially affect HRQOL and daily functioning. Further research is needed to address diagnostic delays and unmet treatment needs for patients with EDS associated with OSA.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBMCen_US
dc.rights© The Author(s). 2020 Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectobstructive sleep apneaen_US
dc.subjectExcessive daytime sleepinessen_US
dc.subjectHealth-related quality of lifeen_US
dc.subjectOSAen_US
dc.subjectSleepinessen_US
dc.subjectHRQOLen_US
dc.subjectQualitative researchen_US
dc.subjectWork productivityen_US
dc.subjectImpact on daily livingen_US
dc.subjectDaily functionen_US
dc.titleUnderstanding the burden of illness of excessive daytime sleepiness associated with obstructive sleep apnea: a qualitative studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1477-7525
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Hlth Sci Ctr Sleep & Circadian Scien_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Div Pulm Allergy Crit Care & Sleep Meden_US
dc.identifier.journalHEALTH AND QUALITY OF LIFE OUTCOMESen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access journalen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleHealth and quality of life outcomes
dc.source.volume18
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage128
dc.source.endpage
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-19T00:37:05Z
dc.source.countryEngland


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© The Author(s). 2020 Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License,
which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give
appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if
changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons
licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons
licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain
permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the
data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s). 2020 Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.