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dc.contributor.advisorMugmon, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorKnox, Grant Stephen
dc.creatorKnox, Grant Stephen
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-26T02:29:15Z
dc.date.available2020-11-26T02:29:15Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationKnox, Grant Stephen. (2020). Examining the Double-Consciousness: Portraits of Americana in the Works of Ulysses Kay (Master's thesis, University of Arizona, Tucson, USA).
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/648655
dc.description.abstractUlysses Simpson Kay, Jr. (1917–1995) was a distinguished American composer, conductor and professor. Having composed approximately 140 works throughout his lifetime, Kay established himself as a prominent figure within the scope of twentieth-century American composition. An African American composer, Kay often seemed to downplay the role of race in his music, an approach perhaps best articulated by his categorical definition of Black music as “music written or conceived by blacks.” Indeed, scholars have debated the role of Kay’s racial identity in his music. An examination of selected works by Ulysses Kay, and their contexts, reveals that his American and African American musical identities coexist. This finding suggests Kay’s music to be a case study in the musical expression of W.E.B. DuBois’s (1868–1963) term “double-consciousness.” DuBois’s writings, particularly his 1903 collection of essays The Souls of Black Folk offer a framework for understanding the role of racial identity in Kay’s music. This study will look at Kay’s Danse Calinda (1941), Lift Every Voice & Sing (1943), Harlem Children’s Dance Suite (1973), and Frederick Douglass (1991) as works that are evocative of the African American identity, while A Lincoln Letter (1953), FDR: From Third Term to Pearl Harbor (1958), Forever Free (1962), Presidential Suite (1965), Southern Harmony (1975) represent the broader American identity. Each of these compositions implies the duality of identities through its subjects, contexts, and/or specific musical details. As a result, we are able to arrive at a more nuanced understanding of the role of racial identity in Ulysses Kay’s music.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction, presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
dc.subjectAfrican-American
dc.subjectAmericana
dc.subjectBlack
dc.subjectDouble-consciousness
dc.subjectMusic
dc.subjectRace
dc.titleExamining the Double-Consciousness: Portraits of Americana in the Works of Ulysses Kay
dc.typetext
dc.typeElectronic Thesis
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizona
thesis.degree.levelmasters
dc.contributor.committeememberBrobeck, John T.
dc.contributor.committeememberRosenblatt, Jay
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate College
thesis.degree.disciplineMusic
thesis.degree.nameM.M.
refterms.dateFOA2020-11-26T02:29:15Z


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