Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHausman, Hanna K
dc.contributor.authorO'Shea, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorKraft, Jessica N
dc.contributor.authorBoutzoukas, Emanuel M
dc.contributor.authorEvangelista, Nicole D
dc.contributor.authorVan Etten, Emily J
dc.contributor.authorBharadwaj, Pradyumna K
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Samantha G
dc.contributor.authorPorges, Eric
dc.contributor.authorHishaw, Georg A
dc.contributor.authorWu, Samuel
dc.contributor.authorDeKosky, Steven
dc.contributor.authorAlexander, Gene E
dc.contributor.authorMarsiske, Michael
dc.contributor.authorCohen, Ronald
dc.contributor.authorWoods, Adam J
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-16T00:07:37Z
dc.date.available2020-12-16T00:07:37Z
dc.date.issued2020-06-12
dc.identifier.citationHausman HK, O’Shea A, Kraft JN, Boutzoukas EM, Evangelista ND, Van Etten EJ, Bharadwaj PK, Smith SG, Porges E, Hishaw GA, Wu S, DeKosky S, Alexander GE, Marsiske M, Cohen R and Woods AJ (2020) The Role of Resting-State Network Functional Connectivity in Cognitive Aging. Front. Aging Neurosci. 12:177. doi: 10.3389/fnagi.2020.00177en_US
dc.identifier.issn1663-4365
dc.identifier.pmid32595490
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnagi.2020.00177
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/649302
dc.description.abstractAging is associated with disruptions in the resting-state functional architecture of the brain. Previous studies have primarily focused on age-related declines in the default mode network (DMN) and its implications in Alzheimer's disease. However, due to mixed findings, it is unclear if changes in resting-state network functional connectivity are linked to cognitive decline in healthy older adults. In the present study, we evaluated the influence of intra-network coherence for four higher-order cognitive resting-state networks on a sensitive measure of cognitive aging (i.e., NIH Toolbox Fluid Cognition Battery) in 154 healthy older adults with a mean age of 71 and education ranging between 12 years and 21 years (mean = 16). Only coherence within the cingulo-opercular network (CON) was significantly related to Fluid Cognition Composite scores, explaining more variance in scores than age and education. Furthermore, we mapped CON connectivity onto fluid cognitive subdomains that typically decline in advanced age. Greater CON connectivity was associated with better performance on episodic memory, attention, and executive function tasks. Overall, the present study provides evidence to propose CON coherence as a potential novel neural marker for nonpathological cognitive aging.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFRONTIERS MEDIA SAen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2020 Hausman, O’Shea, Kraft, Boutzoukas, Evangelista, Van Etten, Bharadwaj, Smith, Porges, Hishaw, Wu, DeKosky, Alexander, Marsiske, Cohen and Woods. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s)are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectcingulo-opercularen_US
dc.subjectCognitive Agingen_US
dc.subjectFunctional connectivityen_US
dc.subjectresting-stateen_US
dc.subjectnetworksen_US
dc.titleThe Role of Resting-State Network Functional Connectivity in Cognitive Agingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Psychol, McKnight Brain Insten_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Med, Dept Psychiat & Neurolen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Psychiat, Neurosci Grad Interdisciplinary Programen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Psychiat, Physiol Sci Grad Interdisciplinary Programen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, BIO5 Insten_US
dc.identifier.journalFRONTIERS IN AGING NEUROSCIENCEen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access journalen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleFrontiers in aging neuroscience
dc.source.volume12
dc.source.beginpage177
dc.source.endpage
refterms.dateFOA2020-12-16T00:07:50Z
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countrySwitzerland


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
fnagi-12-00177.pdf
Size:
1.792Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Final Published Version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Copyright © 2020 Hausman, O’Shea, Kraft, Boutzoukas, Evangelista, Van Etten, Bharadwaj, Smith, Porges, Hishaw, Wu, DeKosky, Alexander, Marsiske, Cohen and Woods. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s)are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2020 Hausman, O’Shea, Kraft, Boutzoukas, Evangelista, Van Etten, Bharadwaj, Smith, Porges, Hishaw, Wu, DeKosky, Alexander, Marsiske, Cohen and Woods. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s)are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.