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dc.contributor.authorWright, H. A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-22T14:27:29Z
dc.date.available2020-12-22T14:27:29Z
dc.date.issued1971-07-01
dc.identifier.citationWright, H. A. (1971). Why squirreltail is more tolerant to burning than needle-and-thread. Journal of Range Management, 24(4), 277-284.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409X
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/3896943
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/650053
dc.description.abstractSquirreltail plants have a low density of dead plant material; consequently, they burn quickly, and heat penetration to the growing points is at a minimum. By contrast, the greater density of dead plant material in needle-and-thread bunches causes them to burn at higher temperatures for longer periods, so that many plants are killed. Squirreltail is also more tolerant than needle-and-thread to herbage removal by clipping.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.titleWhy Squirreltail Is More Tolerant to Burning than Needle-and-Thread
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Range Management
dc.description.noteThis material was digitized as part of a cooperative project between the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries.
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Journal of Range Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform August 2020
dc.source.volume24
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpage277-284
refterms.dateFOA2020-12-22T14:27:29Z


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