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dc.contributor.authorHarding, Scott A
dc.contributor.authorFrost, Christopher J
dc.contributor.authorTsai, Chung-Jui
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-09T02:20:51Z
dc.date.available2021-01-09T02:20:51Z
dc.date.issued2020-09-28
dc.identifier.citationHarding, S. A., Frost, C. J., & Tsai, C. J. (2020). Defoliation-induced compensatory transpiration is compromised in SUT4-RNAi Populus. Plant Direct, 2020;00:1–13.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2475-4455
dc.identifier.pmid33015535
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pld3.268
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/650685
dc.description.abstractThe tonoplast sucrose transporter PtaSUT4 is well expressed in leaves of Populus tremula × Populus alba (INRA 717-IB4), and its inhibition by RNA-interference (RNAi) alters leaf sucrose homeostasis. Whether sucrose partitioning between the vacuole and the cytosol is modulated by PtaSUT4 for specific physiological outcomes in Populus remains unexplored. In this study, partial defoliation was used to elicit compensatory increases in photosynthesis and transpiration by the remaining leaves in greenhouse-grown poplar. Water uptake, leaf gas exchange properties, growth and nonstructural carbohydrate abundance in source and sink organs were then compared between wild-type and SUT4-RNAi lines. Partial defoliation increased maximum photosynthesis rates similarly in all lines. There was no indication that source leaf sugar levels changed differently between wild-type and RNAi plants following partial defoliation. Sink levels of hexose (glucose and fructose) and starch decreased similarly in all lines. Interestingly, plant water uptake after partial defoliation was not as well sustained in RNAi as in wild-type plants. While the compensatory increase in photosynthesis was similar between genotypes, leaf transpiration increased less robustly in RNAi than wild-type plants. SUT4-RNAi and wild-type source leaves differed constitutively in their bulk modulus of elasticity, a measure of leaf turgor, and storage water capacitance. The data demonstrate that reduced sucrose partitioning due to PtaSUT4-RNAi altered turgor control and compensatory transpiration capacity more strikingly than photosynthesis and sugar export. The results are consistent with the interpretation that SUT4 may control vacuolar turgor independently of sink carbon provisioning.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherJOHN WILEY & SONS LTDen_US
dc.rights© 2020 The Authors. Plant Direct published by American Society of Plant Biologists, Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectdefoliationen_US
dc.subjectrelative water contenten_US
dc.subjectsubcellular sucrose partitioningen_US
dc.subjectwater uptakeen_US
dc.titleDefoliation-induced compensatory transpiration is compromised in SUT4‐RNAi Populusen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn2475-4455
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, BIO5 Insten_US
dc.identifier.journalPLANT DIRECTen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access journalen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitlePlant direct
dc.source.volume4
dc.source.issue9
dc.source.beginpagee00268
dc.source.endpage
refterms.dateFOA2021-01-09T02:21:02Z
dc.source.countryEngland


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© 2020 The Authors. Plant Direct published by American Society of Plant Biologists, Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © 2020 The Authors. Plant Direct published by American Society of Plant Biologists, Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.