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dc.contributor.authorVoelkel, Oliver
dc.contributor.authorKlahr, Hubert
dc.contributor.authorMordasini, Christoph
dc.contributor.authorEmsenhuber, Alexandre
dc.contributor.authorLenz, Christian
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-13T02:22:12Z
dc.date.available2021-01-13T02:22:12Z
dc.date.issued2020-10-06
dc.identifier.citationVoelkel, O., Klahr, H., Mordasini, C., Emsenhuber, A., & Lenz, C. (2020). Effect of pebble flux-regulated planetesimal formation on giant planet formation. Astronomy & Astrophysics, 642, A75.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0004-6361
dc.identifier.doi10.1051/0004-6361/202038085
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/650746
dc.description.abstractContext. The formation of gas giant planets by the accretion of 100 km diameter planetesimals is often thought to be inefficient. A diameter of this size is typical for planetesimals and results from self-gravity. Many models therefore use small kilometer-sized planetesimals, or invoke the accretion of pebbles. Furthermore, models based on planetesimal accretion often use the ad hoc assumption of planetesimals that are distributed radially in a minimum-mass solar-nebula way.Aims. We use a dynamical model for planetesimal formation to investigate the effect of various initial radial density distributions on the resulting planet population. In doing so, we highlight the directive role of the early stages of dust evolution into pebbles and planetesimals in the circumstellar disk on the subsequent planet formation.Methods. We implemented a two-population model for solid evolution and a pebble flux-regulated model for planetesimal formation in our global model for planet population synthesis. This framework was used to study the global effect of planetesimal formation on planet formation. As reference, we compared our dynamically formed planetesimal surface densities with ad hoc set distributions of different radial density slopes of planetesimals.Results. Even though required, it is not the total planetesimal disk mass alone, but the planetesimal surface density slope and subsequently the formation mechanism of planetesimals that enables planetary growth through planetesimal accretion. Highly condensed regions of only 100 km sized planetesimals in the inner regions of circumstellar disks can lead to gas giant growth.Conclusions. Pebble flux-regulated planetesimal formation strongly boosts planet formation even when the planetesimals to be accreted are 100 km in size because it is a highly effective mechanism for creating a steep planetesimal density profile. We find that this leads to the formation of giant planets inside 1 au already by pure 100 km planetesimal accretion. Eventually, adding pebble accretion regulated by pebble flux and planetesimal-based embryo formation as well will further complement this picture.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherE D P SCIENCES S Aen_US
dc.rights© O. Voelkel et al. 2020. Open Access article, published by EDP Sciences, under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0).en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectprotoplanetary disksen_US
dc.subjectplanets and satellites: formationen_US
dc.titleEffect of pebble flux-regulated planetesimal formation on giant planet formationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1432-0746
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Lunar & Planetary Laben_US
dc.identifier.journalASTRONOMY & ASTROPHYSICSen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access articleen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleAstronomy & Astrophysics
dc.source.volume642
dc.source.beginpageA75
refterms.dateFOA2021-01-13T02:22:34Z


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© O. Voelkel et al. 2020. Open Access article, published by EDP Sciences, under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © O. Voelkel et al. 2020. Open Access article, published by EDP Sciences, under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0).