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dc.contributor.advisorKratter, Kaitlyn
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Trevor
dc.creatorSmith, Trevor
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-04T04:38:29Z
dc.date.available2021-02-04T04:38:29Z
dc.date.issued2020-05
dc.identifier.citationSmith, Trevor. (2020). THE EFFECTS OF PLANET SCATTERING ON PLANETARY SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE (Bachelor's thesis, University of Arizona, Tucson, USA).
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/651411
dc.description.abstractIn contrast to idealized planet systems of uniform masses and separations, more complex systems informed by observations of multiple-exoplanet systems are not as well understood. To better understand observed exoplanet systems, recent studies have focused on the more complex interactions between planets of unequal masses. In this study, we seek a broad understanding of dynamical evolution in planet populations with qualitatively different mass distributions, starting from compact multiple-planet systems. We find that for all populations, the progression from compact to loosely spaced planets is driven by planet scattering events, which disrupt planets pairs with low dynamical spacing. Our results suggest that the final average dynamical spacing that a population evolves to is correlated with the ratio of high to low mass planets. We also suggest that low numbers of high mass planets disproportionately drive planet losses due to ejections, as we see the dominance of collisions between planets only when the mass distribution is truncated before the high mass regime.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.titleTHE EFFECTS OF PLANET SCATTERING ON PLANETARY SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE
dc.typeElectronic Thesis
dc.typetext
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizona
thesis.degree.levelbachelors
thesis.degree.disciplineAstronomy
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors College
thesis.degree.nameB.S.
refterms.dateFOA2021-02-04T04:38:29Z


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