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dc.contributor.authorMcCullagh, J. S. O.
dc.contributor.authorMarom, A.
dc.contributor.authorHedges, R. E. M.
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-11T21:23:10Z
dc.date.available2021-02-11T21:23:10Z
dc.date.issued2010-01-01
dc.identifier.citationMcCullagh, J. S. O., Marom, A., & Hedges, R. E. M. (2010). Radiocarbon dating of individual amino acids from archaeological bone collagen. Radiocarbon, 52(2), 620-634.
dc.identifier.issn0033-8222
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033822200045653
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/654303
dc.descriptionFrom the 20th International Radiocarbon Conference held in Kona, Hawaii, USA, May 31-June 3, 2009.
dc.description.abstractSince the development of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for radiocarbon dating in the late 1970s, its ability to date small samples of bone has been of huge importance in archaeology and Quaternary paleoecology. The conventional approach to sample preparation has been to extract and gelatinize protein, which is then combusted and graphitized for analysis. However, this 'bulk protein' can contain a heterogeneous mixture of non-collagenous molecules, including humic acids and other soil components that may be of a different age than the bone and therefore affect the accuracy of its 14C date. Sample pretreatment methods have been an important area of development in recent years but still show inadequacies for the dating of severely contaminated bone. The idea of isolating and dating individual compounds such as single amino acids, to improve dating accuracy, has been discussed in the literature since the 1960s. Hydroxyproline, for example, makes up over 10% of bone collagen but is extremely rare in most other animal proteins, increasing the chances of its presence being endogenous to the individual being dated. Its successful isolation has therefore been considered a potential 'gold standard' for dating archaeological bone; however, extracting and suitably purifying single amino acids from bone has proved a challenging task. This paper presents a novel method for the compound-specific 14C dating of individual amino acids, including hydroxyproline, from archaeological bone protein. It is based on a preparative, mixed-mode liquid chromatography separation of underivatized amino acids, entirely in aqueous solution and free of organic solvents. The method is presented here in detail including application to standard bone samples establishing its accuracy and background carbon contribution. Results from 14C dating hydroxyproline and other individual amino acids, from both historical and archaeological bone, are shown to provide AMS dates that are statistically indistinguishable from those of the bulk protein.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherDepartment of Geosciences, The University of Arizona
dc.relation.urlhttp://radiocarbon.webhost.uits.arizona.edu/
dc.rightsCopyright © by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona. All rights reserved.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.titleRadiocarbon Dating of Individual Amino Acids from Archaeological Bone Collagen
dc.typeProceedings
dc.typetext
dc.identifier.journalRadiocarbon
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Radiocarbon archives are made available by Radiocarbon and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform February 2021
dc.source.volume52
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage620
dc.source.endpage634
refterms.dateFOA2021-02-11T21:23:10Z


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