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dc.contributor.authorBurbine, Thomas H.
dc.contributor.authorMcCoy, Timothy J.
dc.contributor.authorNittler, Larry R.
dc.contributor.authorBenedix, Gretchen K.
dc.contributor.authorCloutis, Edward A.
dc.contributor.authorDickinson, Tamara L.
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-12T20:55:44Z
dc.date.available2021-02-12T20:55:44Z
dc.date.issued2002-01-01
dc.identifier.citationBurbine, T. H., McCoy, T. J., Nittler, L. R., Benedix, G. K., Cloutis, E. A., & Dickinson, T. L. (2002). Spectra of extremely reduced assemblages: Implications for Mercury. Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 37(9), 1233-1244.
dc.identifier.issn1945-5100
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1945-5100.2002.tb00892.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/655564
dc.description.abstractWe investigate the possibility that Mercury's crust is very reduced with FeO concentrations of less than ~0.1 wt%. We believe that such a surface could have a composition of enstatite, plagioclase, diopside, and sulfide, similar to the mineral assemblages found in aubritic meteorites. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the spectra of aubrites and their constituent minerals as analogs for the surface of Mercury. We found that some sulfides have distinctive absorption features in their spectra shortwards of ~0.6 micrometers that may be apparent in the spectrum of such an object. Determination of the surface composition of Mercury using orbital x-ray spectroscopy should easily distinguish between a lunar highlands and enstatite basalt composition since these materials have significant differences in concentrations of Al, Mg, S, and Fe. The strongest argument against Mercury having an enstatite basalt composition is its extreme spectral redness. Significant reddening of the surface of an object (such as Mercury) requires reduction of FeO to nanophase iron, thus requiring a few percent FeO in the material prior to alteration.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe Meteoritical Society
dc.relation.urlhttps://meteoritical.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © The Meteoritical Society
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectMercury
dc.subjectcrust
dc.subjectenstatite
dc.subjectplagioclase
dc.subjectdiopside
dc.subjectsulfides
dc.subjectaubritic meteorites
dc.subjectaubrites
dc.subjectLunar highlands
dc.titleSpectra of extremely reduced assemblages: Implications for Mercury
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.identifier.journalMeteoritics & Planetary Science
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Meteoritics & Planetary Science archives are made available by the Meteoritical Society and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform February 2021
dc.source.volume37
dc.source.issue9
dc.source.beginpage1233
dc.source.endpage1244
refterms.dateFOA2021-02-12T20:55:44Z


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