Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHuebner, W. F.
dc.contributor.authorGreenberg, J. M.
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-12T20:55:50Z
dc.date.available2021-02-12T20:55:50Z
dc.date.issued2002-01-01
dc.identifier.citationHuebner, W. F., & Greenberg, J. M. (2002). Workshop summary on physical and chemical properties of potential Earth impactors. Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 37(12), 1642-1647.
dc.identifier.issn1945-5100
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1945-5100.2002.tb01154.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/655594
dc.description.abstractFrom 2001 June 17 to 25, we held the first international workshop in Erice, Italy, dedicated to the determination of geological and geophysical properties of near-Earth objects (NEOs). The goal was to develop a roadmap for determining the physical chemical properties of NEOs in the coming decades to meet the scientific requirements for development of Earth collision avoidance technology. We identified many properties that are desired, but four measurements are needed most critically for any potentially hazardous NEO: (1) its mass, (2) its mass distribution, (3) its material strengths, and (4) its internal structure. Global (whole-body) properties, such as material strengths and internal structure, can be determined best from the analyses of permeating waves: artificially initiated seismology and multifrequency reflection and transmission radio tomography. Seismology provides the best geophysical (material strengths) data of NEOs composed of consolidated materials while radio tomography provides the best geological data (e.g., the state of fracture) of electrically nonconducting media. Thus, teh two methods are complimentary: seismology is most suitable for stony and metallic asteroids, while radio tomography is most appropriate for comet nuclei and carbonaceous asteroids. The three main conclusions are (1) remote sensing for physical characterization should be increased, (2) several dedicated NEO missions should be prepared for geophysical and geological investigations, and (3) that it is prudent to develop and prove the technology to make geophysical measurements on NEOs now.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe Meteoritical Society
dc.relation.urlhttps://meteoritical.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © The Meteoritical Society
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectChemical properties
dc.subjectEarth impactors
dc.titleWorkshop summary on physical and chemical properties of potential Earth impactors
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.identifier.journalMeteoritics & Planetary Science
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Meteoritics & Planetary Science archives are made available by the Meteoritical Society and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform February 2021
dc.source.volume37
dc.source.issue12
dc.source.beginpage1642
dc.source.endpage1647
refterms.dateFOA2021-02-12T20:55:50Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
14679-17016-1-PB.pdf
Size:
1.691Mb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record