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dc.contributor.authorWallace, W. T.
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, L. A.
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Y.
dc.contributor.authorCooper, B. L.
dc.contributor.authorMcKay, D. S.
dc.contributor.authorChen, B.
dc.contributor.authorJeevarajan, A. S.
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-12T22:53:44Z
dc.date.available2021-02-12T22:53:44Z
dc.date.issued2009-01-01
dc.identifier.citationWallace, W. T., Taylor, L. A., Liu, Y., Cooper, B. L., McKay, D. S., Chen, B., & Jeevarajan, A. S. (2009). Lunar dust and lunar simulant activation and monitoring. Meteoritics & Planetary Science, 44(7), 961-970.
dc.identifier.issn1945-5100
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1945-5100.2009.tb00781.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/656588
dc.description.abstractNASA plans to resume human exploration of the Moon in the next decade. One of the pressing concerns is the effect that lunar dust (the fraction of the lunar regolith <20 micrometers in diameter) will have on systems, both human and mechanical, due to the fact that various problems were caused by dust during the Apollo missions. The loss of vacuum integrity in the lunar sample containers during the Apollo era ensured that the present lunar samples are not in the same condition as they were on the Moon; they have been passivated by oxygen and water vapor. To mitigate the harmful effects of lunar dust on humans, methods of "reactivating" the dust must be developed for experimentation, and, ideally, it should be possible to monitor the level of activity to determine methods of deactivating the dust in future lunar habitats. Here we present results demonstrating that simple grinding, as a simple analog to micrometeorite crushing, is capable of substantially activating lunar dust and lunar simulant, and it is possible to determine the level of chemical activity by monitoring the ability of the dust to produce hydroxyl radicals in aqueous solution. Comparisons between ground samples of lunar dust, lunar simulant, and quartz reveal that ground lunar dust is capable of producing over three times the amount of hydroxyl radicals as lunar simulant and an order of magnitude more than ground quartz.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe Meteoritical Society
dc.relation.urlhttps://meteoritical.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © The Meteoritical Society
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectLunar samples
dc.subjectquartz
dc.subjectspectroscopy
dc.titleLunar dust and lunar simulant activation and monitoring
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.identifier.journalMeteoritics & Planetary Science
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Meteoritics & Planetary Science archives are made available by the Meteoritical Society and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.description.admin-noteMigrated from OJS platform February 2021
dc.source.volume44
dc.source.issue7
dc.source.beginpage961
dc.source.endpage970
refterms.dateFOA2021-02-12T22:53:44Z


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