• The importance of interprofessional communication as perceived by first-year medical students and the influence of early clinical exposure upon these perceptions

      Leslie, Alicia; The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix; Denny, Lee Anne (The University of Arizona., 2021)
      The importance of interprofessional communication in the clinical realm and the beneficial nature of early clinical exposure for medical students have been well documented in the literature. This study evaluates how the opinions of first-year medical students at the University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix change over the course of the first year in regard to the importance of interprofessional communication. It also aims to discover whether or not students find the two early clinical exposure courses at the College of Medicine to be useful in developing these opinions. This qualitative research study utilizes a survey composed of two free response questions sent out at the beginning and end of the 2018-2019 school year to the Class of 2022. Using thematic analysis, the authors found that many of the themes in responses stayed the same throughout the year. Students appear to particularly appreciate interprofessional communication for its influence in team-based dynamics and high-quality patient care. This study also found that students frequently described one early clinical exposure course, Community Clinical Experience, as influential in developing perceptions about interprofessional communication.
    • Interprofessional Escape Room: Evaluating Teamwork among Healthcare Profession Students

      Hearn, Jaimie; The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix; Denny, Lee Anne (The University of Arizona., 2021)
      Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate interprofessional teamwork amongst health professions students in an escape room and compare the evaluation of teamwork to the time it takes to “escape the room.” Methods: 42 interprofessional student teams of MD, PA, PT, and OT students participated in an escape room and 40 teams were included in the final data analysis. Each team was evaluated using a modified version of the Jefferson Teamwork Observation Guide (JTOG). Primary outcomes: total JTOG score, overall impression of teamwork score, and escape room time. Secondary outcomes: IPEC theme scores (themes represented in the JTOG) of leadership, communication, roles and responsibilities, and values and ethics. Results: Total JTOG scores had little correlation to escape room time (correlation coefficient = 0.084). Teams with higher overall impression scores tended to escape faster; for every 1-point increase in score, escape room time decreased by 4.78 minutes (95% CI - 7.01, -2.55; p<0.001). For every 1-point increase in the leadership theme, teams took 1.07 minutes longer to escape (95% CI 0.11, 2.04; p=0.031). For every 1-point increase in the teamwork theme, teams took 15.2 minutes longer to escape (95% CI 6.61, 23.7; p=0.001). For every 1-point increase in the communication theme, teams escaped 2.55 minutes faster (95% CI -5.33, 0.23; p=0.07). Conclusion: Teams that escaped the room the fastest had higher overall impression scores of teamwork and higher communication theme scores. Overall, greater team functioning and communication clinically translates to teams being faster and more efficient at problem-solving and moving through tasks.