• The End-to-Side Anastomosis: A Comparative Analysis of Arterial Models in the Rat

      Kaur, Pareena; The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix; Preul, Mark (The University of Arizona., 2021)
      Background: The end-to-side anastomosis is one of the most common anastomosis configurations used in cerebrovascular surgery. Whereas several living practice models have been proposed for this technique, few involve purely arterial vessels. Objective: The purpose of this study is to compare two arterial models using common carotid (CCA) and common iliac arteries (CIA) in rats. Methods: CIAs and CCAs were exposed in 10 anesthetized rats with their lengths and diameters measured. Also, the mobilization extent of each vessel along its contralateral counterpart was measured after each artery was transected at its proximal exposure point. We also studied the technical advantages and disadvantages of each model for practicing end-to-side anastomosis. Results: The average diameters of the CCA and CIA were 1.1mm and 1.3mm, respectively. The average extents of mobilization along the contralateral vessel were 13.9mm and 10.3mm for CCA and CIA, respectively. The CCA model had the advantages of more arterial redundancy (allowing completing both suture lines extraluminally) and minimal risk of venous injury. The main disadvantage of the CCA model was risk of cerebral ischemia. The CIA model was not limited by ischemia time and provided the technical challenge of microsurgical dissection of the common iliac vein from the CIA, while suffering from limited CIA redundancy. Conclusion: Both CCA and CIA models could be efficiency used for practicing the end-to-side anastomosis technique. Each provides the trainee with a specific set of advantages and disadvantages that could help with optimal selection of the practice model based on trainee’s skill level.