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dc.contributor.authorGurney, C. M.
dc.contributor.authorPrugh, L. R.
dc.contributor.authorBrashares, J. S.
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-08T18:37:18Z
dc.date.available2021-03-08T18:37:18Z
dc.date.issued2015-07
dc.identifier.citationGurney, C. M., Prugh, L. R., & Brashares, J. S. (2015). Restoration of Native Plants is Reduced by Rodent-Caused Soil Disturbance and Seed Removal. Rangeland Ecology & Management, 68(4), 359–366.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409x
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.rama.2015.05.001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/656918
dc.description.abstractGranivory and soil disturbance are two modes by which burrowing rodents may limit the success of native plant restoration in rangelands. This guild of animals has prolific effects on plant community composition and structure, yet surprisingly little research has quantified the impact of rodents on plant restoration efforts. In this study, we examined the effects of seed removal and soil disturbance by the giant kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ingens) on native plant restoration in a California rangeland. Using experimental exclosures and stratifying restoration plots on and off rodent-disturbed soil, we assessed the individual and combined effects of seed removal and soil disturbance on seedling establishment of four native plant species. Across all species, biotic soil disturbance by kangaroo rats reduced seedling establishment by 19.5% (range = 1-43%), whereas seed removal reduced seedling establishment by only 6.7% (range = 4-12%). Rates of seed removal across species weakly paralleled kangaroo rat dietary preferences. These results indicate the indirect effects of burrowing rodents such as kangaroo rats on native seedling establishment via changes in soil properties may rival or exceed the direct effects of seed removal. © 2015 Society for Range Management. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectDipodomys
dc.subjectgranivory
dc.subjectrestoration
dc.subjectsoil disturbance
dc.subjectvalley grassland
dc.titleRestoration of Native Plants is Reduced by Rodent-Caused Soil Disturbance and Seed Removal
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.identifier.journalRangeland Ecology & Management
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Rangeland Ecology & Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.source.journaltitleRangeland Ecology & Management
dc.source.volume68
dc.source.issue4
dc.source.beginpage359
dc.source.endpage366
refterms.dateFOA2021-03-08T18:37:18Z


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