Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorVeblen, K. E.
dc.contributor.authorPyke, D. A.
dc.contributor.authorAldridge, C. L.
dc.contributor.authorCasazza, M. L.
dc.contributor.authorAssal, T. J.
dc.contributor.authorFarinha, M. A.
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-08T18:43:13Z
dc.date.available2021-03-08T18:43:13Z
dc.date.issued2014-01
dc.identifier.citationVeblen, K. E., Pyke, D. A., Aldridge, C. L., Casazza, M. L., Assal, T. J., & Farinha, M. A. (2014). Monitoring of livestock grazing effects on bureau of land management land. Rangeland Ecology & Management, 67(1), 68–77.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409x
dc.identifier.doi10.2111/REM-D-12-00178.1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/657033
dc.description.abstractPublic land management agencies, such as the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), are charged with managing rangelands throughout the western United States for multiple uses, such as livestock grazing and conservation of sensitive species and their habitats. Monitoring of condition and trends of these rangelands, particularly with respect to effects of livestock grazing, provides critical information for effective management of these multiuse landscapes. We therefore investigated the availability of livestock grazing-related quantitative monitoring data and qualitative region-specific Land Health Standards (LHS) data across BLM grazing allotments in the western United States. We then queried university and federal rangeland science experts about how best to prioritize rangeland monitoring activities. We found that the most commonly available monitoring data were permittee-reported livestock numbers and season-of-use data (71% of allotments) followed by repeat photo points (58%), estimates of forage utilization (52%), and, finally, quantitative vegetation measurements (37%). Of the 57% of allotments in which LHS had been evaluated as of 2007, the BLM indicated 15% had failed to meet LHS due to livestock grazing. A full complement of all types of monitoring data, however, existed for only 27% of those 15%. Our data inspections, as well as conversations with rangeland experts, indicated a need for greater emphasis on collection of grazing-related monitoring data, particularly ground cover. Prioritization of where monitoring activities should be focused, along with creation of regional monitoring teams, may help improve monitoring. Overall, increased emphasis on monitoring of BLM rangelands will require commitment at multiple institutional levels. © 2014 The Society for Range Management.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectland health status
dc.subjectland use impacts
dc.subjectpublic lands
dc.subjectrangeland health
dc.subjectsagebrush steppe
dc.titleMonitoring of livestock grazing effects on bureau of land management land
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.identifier.journalRangeland Ecology & Management
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Rangeland Ecology & Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.source.journaltitleRangeland Ecology & Management
dc.source.volume67
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage68
dc.source.endpage77
refterms.dateFOA2021-03-08T18:43:13Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
Monitoring-of-Livestock-Grazin ...
Size:
206.0Kb
Format:
PDF

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record