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dc.contributor.authorVermeire, L. T.
dc.contributor.authorCrowder, J. L.
dc.contributor.authorWester, D. B.
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-08T18:43:18Z
dc.date.available2021-03-08T18:43:18Z
dc.date.issued2014-01
dc.identifier.citationVermeire, L. T., Crowder, J. L., & Wester, D. B. (2014). Semiarid rangeland is resilient to summer fire and postfire grazing utilization. Rangeland Ecology & Management, 67(1), 52–60.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409x
dc.identifier.doi10.2111/REM-D-13-00007.1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/657035
dc.description.abstractMost wildfires occur during summer in the northern hemisphere, the area burned annually is increasing, and fire effects during this season are least understood. Understanding plant response to grazing following summer fire is required to reduce ecological and financial risks associated with wildfire. Forty 0.75-ha plots were assigned to summer fire then 0, 17, 34 or 50% biomass removal by grazing the following growing season, or no fire and no grazing. Root, litter, and aboveground biomass were measured before fire, immediately after grazing, and 1 yr after grazing with the experiment repeated during 2 yr to evaluate weather effects. Fire years were followed by the second driest and fifth wettest springs in 70 yr. Biomass was more responsive to weather than fire and grazing, with a 452% increase from a dry to wet year and 31% reduction from a wet to average spring. Fire reduced litter 53% and had no first-year effect on productivity for any biomass component. Grazing after fire reduced postgrazing grass biomass along the prescribed utilization gradient. Fire and grazing had no effect on total aboveground productivity the year after grazing compared to nonburned, nongrazed sites (1 327 vs. 1 249 ± 65 kg · ha-1). Fire and grazing increased grass productivity 16%, particularly for Pascopyrum smithii. The combined disturbances reduced forbs (51%), annual grasses (49%), and litter (46%). Results indicate grazing with up to 50% biomass removal the first growing season after summer fire was not detrimental to productivity of semiarid rangeland plant communities. Livestock exclusion the year after summer fire did not increase productivity or shift species composition compared to grazed sites. Reduction of previous years' standing dead material was the only indication that fire may temporarily reduce forage availability. The consistent responses among dry, wet, and near-average years suggest plant response is species-specific rather than climatically controlled. © 2014 The Society for Range Management.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectdrought
dc.subjectgrassland
dc.subjectherbivory
dc.subjectprescribed burn
dc.subjectproductivity
dc.subjectwildfire
dc.titleSemiarid rangeland is resilient to summer fire and postfire grazing utilization
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.identifier.journalRangeland Ecology & Management
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Rangeland Ecology & Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.source.journaltitleRangeland Ecology & Management
dc.source.volume67
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage52
dc.source.endpage60
refterms.dateFOA2021-03-08T18:43:18Z


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