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dc.contributor.authorDemaso, S. J.
dc.contributor.authorHernández, F.
dc.contributor.authorBrennan, L. A.
dc.contributor.authorSilvy, N. J.
dc.contributor.authorGrant, W. E.
dc.contributor.authorBen, Wu, X.
dc.contributor.authorBryant, F. C.
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-08T18:43:21Z
dc.date.available2021-03-08T18:43:21Z
dc.date.issued2014-01
dc.identifier.citationDemaso, S. J., Hernández, F., Brennan, L. A., Silvy, N. J., Grant, W. E., Ben Wu, X., & Bryant, F. C. (2014). Short-and long-term influence of brush canopy cover on northern bobwhite demography in southern Texas. Rangeland Ecology & Management, 67(1), 99–106.
dc.identifier.issn0022-409x
dc.identifier.doi10.2111/REM-D-13-00094.1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/657036
dc.description.abstractExtensive research has been devoted to quantifying the habitat needs and selection of many wildlife species. However, how habitat selection affects the long-term demographic performance of a species largely has been ignored. We used northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) and brush canopy coverage-an important habitat component for quail-to evaluate the influence of habitat on short-and long-term demographic performance of this species. We used data from a 5-yr (2001-2005) radiotelemetry study of northern bobwhite in southern Texas to obtain estimates of bobwhite density, survival, and production on three study areas with 5%, 11%, and 32% brush canopy cover. Our objectives were to compare these demographic variables individually among brush canopy cover classes and then simulate their cumulative effect on demographic performance using a simulation model. All demographic parameters were similar among the three brush canopy cover classes. However, simulation modeling indicated that long-term demographic performance was greater on the 11% and 32% brush canopy cover classes. Simulated bobwhite populations were 2-3 times higher in these two cover classes than the 5% brush canopy cover class. In addition, the probability of population persistence was greater in the 11% (0.91) and 32% (1.00) brush canopy cover classes than the 5% cover class (0.54) using a quasi-extinction criterion of ≤ 40 birds (≤ 0.05 birds · ha-1). Our study highlights the shortcoming of considering only short-term effects when comparing habitat given that short-and long-term effects of habitat on demographic performance can differ. © 2014 The Society for Range Management.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Range Management
dc.relation.urlhttps://rangelands.org/
dc.rightsCopyright © Society for Range Management.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectcanopy
dc.subjectColinus virginianus
dc.subjectdensity
dc.subjectpopulation extinction
dc.subjectquail
dc.subjectwoody cover
dc.titleShort-and long-term influence of brush canopy cover on northern bobwhite demography in southern Texas
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.identifier.journalRangeland Ecology & Management
dc.description.collectioninformationThe Rangeland Ecology & Management archives are made available by the Society for Range Management and the University of Arizona Libraries. Contact lbry-journals@email.arizona.edu for further information.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.source.journaltitleRangeland Ecology & Management
dc.source.volume67
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage99
dc.source.endpage106
refterms.dateFOA2021-03-08T18:43:21Z


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