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dc.contributor.authorLacombe, Jerome
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Ashlee F.
dc.contributor.authorZenhausern, Ryan
dc.contributor.authorKarsunsky, Sophia
dc.contributor.authorZenhausern, Frederic
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-02T20:04:12Z
dc.date.available2021-04-02T20:04:12Z
dc.date.issued2020-08
dc.identifier.citationLacombe, J., Harris, A. F., Zenhausern, R., Karsunsky, S., & Zenhausern, F. (2020). Plant-Based Scaffolds Modify Cellular Response to Drug and Radiation Exposure Compared to Standard Cell Culture Models. Frontiers in bioengineering and biotechnology, 8, 932.
dc.identifier.issn2296-4185
dc.identifier.pmid32850759
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fbioe.2020.00932
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/657430
dc.description.abstractPlant-based scaffolds present many advantages over a variety of biomaterials. Recent studies explored their potential to be repopulated with human cells and thus highlight a growing interest for their use in tissue engineering or for biomedical applications. However, it is still unclear if thesein vitroplant-based scaffolds can modify cell phenotype or affect cellular response to external stimuli. Here, we report the characterization of the mechano-regulation of melanoma SK-MEL-28 and prostate PC3 cells seeded on decellularized spinach leaves scaffolds, compared to cells deposited on standard rigid cell culture substrate, as well as their response to drug and radiation treatment. The results showed that YAP/TAZ signaling was downregulated, cellular morphology altered and proliferation rate decreased when cells were cultured on leaf scaffold. Interestingly, cell culture on vegetal scaffold also affected cellular response to external stress. Thus, SK-MEL-28 cells phenotype is modified leading to a decrease in MITF activity and drug resistance, while PC3 cells showed altered gene expression and radiation response. These findings shed lights on the decellularization of vegetal materials to provide substrates that can be repopulated with human cells to better reproduce a soft tissue microenvironment. However, these complex scaffolds mediate changes in cell behavior and in order to exploit the capability of matching physical properties of the various plant scaffolds to diverse physiological functionalities of cells and human tissue constructs, additional studies are required to better characterize physical and biochemical cell-substrate interactions.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherFRONTIERS MEDIA SA
dc.rightsCopyright © 2020 Lacombe, Harris, Zenhausern, Karsunsky and Zenhausern. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjecttissue engineering
dc.subjectdecellularization
dc.subjectplant-based scaffold
dc.subjectstiffness
dc.subjectYAP
dc.subjectTAZ pathway
dc.subjectradiation
dc.titlePlant-Based Scaffolds Modify Cellular Response to Drug and Radiation Exposure Compared to Standard Cell Culture Models
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Med Phoenix, Ctr Appl NanoBiosci & Med
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Engn, Dept Biomed Engn
dc.identifier.journalFRONTIERS IN BIOENGINEERING AND BIOTECHNOLOGY
dc.description.noteOpen access journal
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.source.journaltitleFRONTIERS IN BIOENGINEERING AND BIOTECHNOLOGY
refterms.dateFOA2021-04-02T20:04:12Z


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Copyright © 2020 Lacombe, Harris, Zenhausern, Karsunsky and Zenhausern. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2020 Lacombe, Harris, Zenhausern, Karsunsky and Zenhausern. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).