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dc.contributor.authorMartellato, E.
dc.contributor.authorBramson, A. M.
dc.contributor.authorCremonese, G.
dc.contributor.authorLucchetti, A.
dc.contributor.authorMarzari, F.
dc.contributor.authorMassironi, M.
dc.contributor.authorRe, C.
dc.contributor.authorByrne, S.
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-23T00:39:01Z
dc.date.available2021-04-23T00:39:01Z
dc.date.issued2020-07-20
dc.identifier.citationMartellato, E., Bramson, A. M., Cremonese, G., Lucchetti, A., Marzari, F., Massironi, M., ... & Byrne, S. (2020). Martian Ice Revealed by Modeling of Simple Terraced Crater Formation. Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, 125(10), e2019JE006108.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2169-9097
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2019je006108
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/657884
dc.description.abstractArcadia Planitia, a region in the northern midlatitudes of Mars, displays an uncommonly high abundance of simple craters with a concentric morphology, which is indicative of layering beneath the surface. Radar measurements suggest that the near surface layers could be made of excess water ice. In this study, we select two of these impact structures of similar size (D-c similar to 500 m), model their formation through iSALE shock physics code, and investigate the dependence of the final crater morphology on the material model parameters (cohesion and friction coefficient). Our parameter study shows that the intact and damaged cohesions of the nonporous ice play a fundamental role to obtain a good fit between our models and the topographic profiles taken from the digital terrain models in terms of crater diameter, crater wall inclination, and depth and size of the upper terrace. The central pit shape is instead controlled by the damaged friction coefficient of the basaltic crust, but it is mainly affected by projectile density and speed. Our results confirm that two layers of relatively pure water ice, each with different rheology and porosity, can explain the unique double-terraced morphology of impact craters in Arcadia Planitia. The low values of cohesion we find for the ice might point to snowfall as emplacement mechanism in the region. The different thicknesses of the ice layers in the two crater areas seem to suggest variations in ice deposition and/or evolution history across Arcadia Planitia. Plain Language Summary Impact craters are described by a bowl-shaped morphology at smaller sizes. Any departure from such a shape provides insight into subsurface target properties, including changes in density, strength, water content, porosity, and composition. In particular, the presence of steps (or "terraces") along the walls of simple craters provides a straightforward example of complexity within the planetary crusts, and indicates an abrupt transition from upper, weaker layers to deeper, stronger material. Using numerical modeling, we studied two examples of terraced craters in Arcadia Planitia, Mars, to derive information about the rheological properties of the upper Martian crust. This analysis supports radar remote sensing measurements and suggests shallow ice-rich layers in Martian midlatitudes terrains could plausibly cause the terraces observed in these craters. The distribution and properties of water ice are important for understanding Mars' climatic history, as well as the availability of in-situ resources for future human exploration.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipINAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padovaen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAMER GEOPHYSICAL UNIONen_US
dc.rights© 2020. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectMarsen_US
dc.subjectimpact cratersen_US
dc.subjecticeen_US
dc.subjectnumerical modelingen_US
dc.titleMartian Ice Revealed by Modeling of Simple Terraced Crater Formationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn2169-9100
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Lunar & Planetary Laben_US
dc.identifier.journalJOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-PLANETSen_US
dc.description.note6 month embargo; first published online 20 July 2020en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Geophysical Research: Planets
dc.source.volume125
dc.source.issue10
refterms.dateFOA2021-01-20T00:00:00Z


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