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dc.contributor.authorVillarreal, Miguel L
dc.contributor.authorIniguez, José M
dc.contributor.authorFlesch, Aaron D
dc.contributor.authorSanderlin, Jamie S
dc.contributor.authorCortés Montaño, Citlali
dc.contributor.authorConrad, Caroline R
dc.contributor.authorHaire, Sandra L
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-04T21:43:09Z
dc.date.available2021-05-04T21:43:09Z
dc.date.issued2020-11-12
dc.identifier.citationVillarreal, M. L., Iniguez, J. M., Flesch, A. D., Sanderlin, J. S., Cortés Montaño, C., Conrad, C. R., & Haire, S. L. (2020). Contemporary Fire Regimes Provide a Critical Perspective on Restoration Needs in the Mexico-United States Borderlands. Air, Soil and Water Research, 13, 1178622120969191.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1178-6221
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1178622120969191
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/658136
dc.description.abstractThe relationship between people and wildfire has always been paradoxical: fire is an essential ecological process and management tool, but can also be detrimental to life and property. Consequently, fire regimes have been modified throughout history through both intentional burning to promote benefits and active suppression to reduce risks. Reintroducing fire and its benefits back into the Sky Island mountains of the United States-Mexico borderlands has the potential to reduce adverse effects of altered fire regimes and build resilient ecosystems and human communities. To help guide regional fire restoration, we describe the frequency and severity of recent fires over a 32-year period (1985-2017) across a vast binational region in the United States-Mexico borderlands and assess variation in fire frequency and severity across climate gradients and in relation to vegetation and land tenure classes. We synthesize relevant literature on historical fire regimes within 9 major vegetation types and assess how observed contemporary fire characteristics vary from expectations based on historical patterns. Less than 28% of the study area burned during the observation period, excluding vegetation types in warmer climates that are not adapted to fire (eg, Desertscrub and Thornscrub). Average severity of recent fires was low despite some extreme outliers in cooler, wetter environments. Midway along regional temperature and precipitation gradients, approximately 64% of Pine-Oak Forests burned at least once, with fire frequencies that mainly corresponded to historical expectations on private lands in Mexico but less so on communal lands, suggesting the influence of land management. Fire frequency was higher than historical expectations in extremely cool and wet environments that support forest types such as Spruce-Fir, indicating threats to these systems possibly attributable to drought and other factors. In contrast, fires were absent or infrequent across large areas of Woodlands (similar to 73% unburned) and Grasslands (similar to 88% unburned) due possibly to overgrazing, which reduces abundance and continuity of fine fuels needed to carry fire. Our findings provide a new depiction of fire regimes in the Sky Islands that can help inform fire management, restoration, and regional conservation planning, fostered by local and traditional knowledge and collaboration among landowners and managers.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipU.S. Geological Land Change Science Program and Land Resources Mission Areaen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSAGE PUBLICATIONS LTDen_US
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2020. Creative Commons Non Commercial CC BY-NC: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectWildfireen_US
dc.subjectSky Islandsen_US
dc.subjectfire severityen_US
dc.subjectfuels treatmentsen_US
dc.subjectreference conditionsen_US
dc.subjectLandsaten_US
dc.subjectclimateen_US
dc.titleContemporary Fire Regimes Provide a Critical Perspective on Restoration Needs in the Mexico-United States Borderlandsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1178-6221
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Sch Nat Resources & Environmen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Desert Lab Tumamoc Hillen_US
dc.identifier.journalAIR SOIL AND WATER RESEARCHen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access journalen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleAir, Soil and Water Research
dc.source.volume13
dc.source.beginpage117862212096919
refterms.dateFOA2021-05-04T21:43:11Z


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© The Author(s) 2020. Creative Commons Non Commercial CC BY-NC: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2020. Creative Commons Non Commercial CC BY-NC: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).