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dc.contributor.authorButler, James
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-14T19:45:38Z
dc.date.available2021-05-14T19:45:38Z
dc.date.issued2021-05-13
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/658314
dc.descriptionSustainable Built Environments Senior Capstone Projecten_US
dc.description.abstractThe growing wealth gap and lack of available low-income housing have become significant problems in the United States. Lack of available low-income housing leads to an increase in homelessness and financial hardship for low-income families. In Tucson, low-income housing options are few and far between. This project is designed to get a perspective from a property developer on why there are so few low-income housing complexes in Tucson. It also tries to identify solutions and incentives for developers to build more low-income housing complexes while still being economically viable. This project asked essential questions about low-income housing to local developers, gathering statistical data and developing a financial analysis on low-income and non-low-income properties, researching different government programs and funds available to local developers, and researching unorthodox strategies that cities or developers can implement. Through research in this project, there are particular economic and political reasons why developers avoid investing in low-income housing. Another key finding from the study is there are different programs and risk-mitigation strategies that can limit risk in investment of low-income housing development. The main incentives and strategies found that developers can use to build more low-income housing are applying for Low Income Housing Tax Credit, applying for the Tucson Community Block Grant, identifying abandoned buildings to construct low-income housing, and taking advantage of Tucson’s GPLET program. The main strategies found that the City of Tucson can implement to promote low-income housing complexes are relaxing zoning laws, building more city-owned parking garages, and removing off-street parking requirements. Developers can use this project to determine a strategy and incentives that can be used to develop low-income housing, which Tucson desperately craves.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subjectSustainabilityen_US
dc.subjectBuilt Environmenten_US
dc.subjectlow-income housingen_US
dc.subjectdevelopmenten_US
dc.subjectdevelopersen_US
dc.subjectArizona -- Tucson.en_US
dc.titleGetting a Fair Share: How Developers Can Increase Development of Low-Income Housingen_US
dc.typethesisen_US
dc.typeposteren_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSustainable Built Environmentsen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the Sustainable Built Environments collection. For more information, contact http://sbe.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.contributor.instructorIuliano, Joey
refterms.dateFOA2021-05-14T19:45:38Z


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