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dc.contributor.authorNiu, Furong
dc.contributor.authorPierce, Nathan A.
dc.contributor.authorArcher, Steven R.
dc.contributor.authorOkin, Gregory S.
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-11T00:10:18Z
dc.date.available2021-06-11T00:10:18Z
dc.date.issued2021-05-21
dc.identifier.citationNiu, F., Pierce, N. A., Archer, S. R., & Okin, G. S. (2021). Germination and early establishment of dryland grasses and shrubs on intact and wind-eroded soils under greenhouse conditions. Plant and Soil, 1-16.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0032-079X
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11104-021-05005-9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/659862
dc.description.abstractAims: Grassland-to-shrubland transition is a common form of land degradation in drylands worldwide. It is often attributed to changes in disturbance regimes, particularly overgrazing. A myriad of direct and indirect effects (e.g., accelerated soil erosion) of grazing may favor shrubs over grasses, but their relative importance is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that topsoil “winnowing” by wind erosion would differentially affect grass and shrub seedling establishment to promote shrub recruitment over that of grass. Methods: We monitored germination and seedling growth of contrasting perennial grass (Bouteloua eriopoda, Sporobolus airoides, and Aristida purpurea) and shrub (Prosopis glandulosa, Atriplex canescens, and Larrea tridentata) functional groups on field-collected non-winnowed and winnowed soils under well-watered greenhouse conditions. Results: Non-winnowed soils were finer-textured and had higher nutrient contents than winnowed soils, but based on desorption curves, winnowed soils had more plant-available moisture. Contrary to expectations, seed germination and seedling growth on winnowed and non-winnowed soils were comparable within a given species. The N2-fixing deciduous shrub P. glandulosa was first to emerge and complete germination, and had the greatest biomass accumulation of all species. Conclusions: Germination and early seedling growth of grasses and shrubs on winnowed soils were not adversely nor differentially affected comparing with that observed on non-winnowed soils under well-watered greenhouse conditions. Early germination and rapid growth may give P. glandulosa a competitive advantage over grasses and other shrub species at the establishment stage in grazed grasslands. Field establishment experiments are needed to confirm our findings in these controlled environment trials. © 2021, The Author(s).en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundationen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLCen_US
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2021. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.subjectAeolian processesen_US
dc.subjectBouteloua eriopodaen_US
dc.subjectChihuahuan Desert grasslanden_US
dc.subjectPlant functional groupen_US
dc.subjectProsopis glandulosaen_US
dc.subjectShrub encroachmenten_US
dc.titleGermination and early establishment of dryland grasses and shrubs on intact and wind-eroded soils under greenhouse conditionsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1573-5036
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalPlant and Soilen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access articleen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.identifier.pii5005
dc.source.journaltitlePlant and Soil
refterms.dateFOA2021-06-11T00:10:19Z


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© The Author(s) 2021. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2021. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.