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dc.contributor.authorClinkscales, C.
dc.contributor.authorKapp, P.
dc.contributor.authorThomson, S.
dc.contributor.authorWang, H.
dc.contributor.authorLaskowski, A.
dc.contributor.authorOrme, D.A.
dc.contributor.authorPullen, A.
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-18T01:22:56Z
dc.date.available2021-06-18T01:22:56Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationClinkscales, C., Kapp, P., Thomson, S., Wang, H., Laskowski, A., Orme, D. A., & Pullen, A. (2021). Regional Exhumation and Tectonic History of the Shanxi Rift and Taihangshan, North China. Tectonics, 40(3), e2020TC006416.
dc.identifier.issn0278-7407
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2020TC006416
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/660060
dc.description.abstractThis study presents a comprehensive low-temperature thermochronometric data set from the Shanxi Rift, Taihangshan, and eastern Ordos block in North China, including new apatite fission track and apatite (U-Th-Sm)/He data and published apatite and zircon fission track and (U-Th-Sm)/He data. We use these data and new thermal history inversion models to reveal that the Shanxi Rift and Taihangshan experienced an increase in cooling rates between ca. 110–70 Ma and ca. 50–30 Ma. A preceding ca. 160–135 Ma cooling event is generally restricted to the western rift margin in the Lüliangshan and Hengshan. In contrast, the ca. 50–30 Ma cooling event was widespread and occurred coevally with the opening of the Bohai Basin and slip across the NNE-striking Eastern Taihangshan fault. In the southern rift zone, however, exhumation beginning ca. 50 Ma was likely associated with fault block uplift across the ESE–striking Qinling and Huashan faults, which accompanied the extensional opening of the Weihe Graben. Coeval fault slip along the NNE–striking Eastern Taihangshan faults and ESE–striking Qinling and Huashan faults was associated with NW-SE extension in North China related to oblique subduction of the Pacific plate under Eastern Asia and slow convergence rates. The Shanxi Rift is commonly attributed to Late Miocene and younger extension, but our new thermochronologic data do not precisely record the onset of rifting. However, our inversion models do suggest ≤∼50°C of Neogene–Quaternary cooling, consistent with ≤∼2 km of footwall uplift across most range-bounding faults. © 2021. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.rightsCopyright © 2021 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectNorth China
dc.subjectRegional Tectonics
dc.subjectThermochronology
dc.titleRegional Exhumation and Tectonic History of the Shanxi Rift and Taihangshan, North China
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Geosciences, University of Arizona
dc.identifier.journalTectonics
dc.description.note6 month embargo; first published: 21 January 2021
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.source.journaltitleTectonics


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