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dc.contributor.authorLee, E.
dc.contributor.authorKumar, P.
dc.contributor.authorKnowles, J.F.
dc.contributor.authorMinor, R.L.
dc.contributor.authorTran, N.
dc.contributor.authorBarron-Gafford, G.A.
dc.contributor.authorScott, R.L.
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-14T00:28:27Z
dc.date.available2021-07-14T00:28:27Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationLee, E., Kumar, P., Knowles, J. F., Minor, R. L., Tran, N., Barron-Gafford, G. A., & Scott, R. L. (2021). Convergent Hydraulic Redistribution and Groundwater Access Supported Facilitative Dependency Between Trees and Grasses in a Semi-Arid Environment. Water Resources Research, 57(6).
dc.identifier.issn0043-1397
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2020WR028103
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/660371
dc.description.abstractHydraulic redistribution is the transport of water from wet to dry soil layers, upward or downward, through plant roots. Often in savanna and woodland ecosystems, deep-rooted trees, and shallow-rooted grasses coexist. The degree to which these different species compete for or share soil-water derived from precipitation or groundwater, as well as how these interactions are altered by hydraulic redistribution, is unknown. We use a multilayer canopy model and field observations to examine how the presence of deep, but tree-root accessible, groundwater impacts seasonal patterns of hydraulic redistribution, and interaction between coexisting vegetation species in a semiarid riparian woodland (US-CMW). Based on the simulation, trees absorb moisture at the water table (∼10 m depth) and release it in the shallow soil depth (0–3 m) during the dry pre-monsoon season. We observed the occurrence of a new convergent hydraulic redistribution pattern during the monsoon season, where moisture is transported from both the near-surface (0–0.5 m) and the water table to intermediate soil layers (1–5 m) through tree roots. We found that hydraulic redistribution demonstrates a growth facilitation effect at this site, supporting 49% of growing season tree transpiration and 14% of the grass transpiration. Compared to a similarly structured upland savanna without accessible groundwater, the riparian site shows an increased amount of hydraulically redistributed water and more facilitative water use between coexisting grasses and trees. These results shed light on the linkage between accessible groundwater and the role of hydraulic redistribution on the interaction between deep-rooted and shallow-rooted vegetation. © 2021. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.rights© 2021 American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectconvergent flow
dc.subjectgroundwater
dc.subjecthydraulic redistribution
dc.subjectwater use
dc.titleConvergent Hydraulic Redistribution and Groundwater Access Supported Facilitative Dependency Between Trees and Grasses in a Semi-Arid Environment
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Geography & Development, University of Arizona
dc.identifier.journalWater Resources Research
dc.description.note6 month embargo; first published: 27 May 2021
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.source.journaltitleWater Resources Research


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