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dc.contributor.authorRoux, S.
dc.contributor.authorPaul, B.G.
dc.contributor.authorBagby, S.C.
dc.contributor.authorNayfach, S.
dc.contributor.authorAllen, M.A.
dc.contributor.authorAttwood, G.
dc.contributor.authorCavicchioli, R.
dc.contributor.authorChistoserdova, L.
dc.contributor.authorGruninger, R.J.
dc.contributor.authorHallam, S.J.
dc.contributor.authorHernandez, M.E.
dc.contributor.authorHess, M.
dc.contributor.authorLiu, W.-T.
dc.contributor.authorMcAllister, T.A.
dc.contributor.authorO’Malley, M.A.
dc.contributor.authorPeng, X.
dc.contributor.authorRich, V.I.
dc.contributor.authorSaleska, S.R.
dc.contributor.authorEloe-Fadrosh, E.A.
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-17T01:38:22Z
dc.date.available2021-07-17T01:38:22Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.citationRoux, S., Paul, B. G., Bagby, S. C., Nayfach, S., Allen, M. A., Attwood, G., Cavicchioli, R., Chistoserdova, L., Gruninger, R. J., Hallam, S. J., Hernandez, M. E., Hess, M., Liu, W.-T., McAllister, T. A., O’Malley, M. A., Peng, X., Rich, V. I., Saleska, S. R., & Eloe-Fadrosh, E. A. (2021). Ecology and molecular targets of hypermutation in the global microbiome. Nature Communications, 12(1).
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723
dc.identifier.pmid34031405
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41467-021-23402-7
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/660662
dc.description.abstractChanges in the sequence of an organism’s genome, i.e., mutations, are the raw material of evolution. The frequency and location of mutations can be constrained by specific molecular mechanisms, such as diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs). DGRs have been characterized from cultivated bacteria and bacteriophages, and perform error-prone reverse transcription leading to mutations being introduced in specific target genes. DGR loci were also identified in several metagenomes, but the ecological roles and evolutionary drivers of these DGRs remain poorly understood. Here, we analyze a dataset of >30,000 DGRs from public metagenomes, establish six major lineages of DGRs including three primarily encoded by phages and seemingly used to diversify host attachment proteins, and demonstrate that DGRs are broadly active and responsible for >10% of all amino acid changes in some organisms. Overall, these results highlight the constraints under which DGRs evolve, and elucidate several distinct roles these elements play in natural communities. © 2021, The Author(s).
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNature Research
dc.rightsCopyright © The Regents of the University of California 2021. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleEcology and molecular targets of hypermutation in the global microbiome
dc.typeArticle
dc.typetext
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona
dc.identifier.journalNature Communications
dc.description.noteOpen access journal
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
dc.eprint.versionFinal published version
dc.source.journaltitleNature Communications
refterms.dateFOA2021-07-17T01:38:22Z


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Copyright © The Regents of the University of California 2021. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © The Regents of the University of California 2021. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.